THE SCI­ENCE OF PACK­ING

Dr Karl Kruszel­nicki keeps it sim­ple

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - Escape - - HOW I PACK -

Dr Karl Kruszel­nicki – aka Dr Karl – has be­come a house­hold name thanks to his abil­ity to ex­plain com­plex sci­en­tific con­cepts in lay­man’s terms. And when it comes to pack­ing, the high IQ-en­dowed na­tional trea­sure ap­plies his no-non­sense prin­ci­ples. Whether it’s Mon­go­lia, Ti­bet or Antarc­tica – where he’s lead­ing a voy­age next year – the au­thor, pre­sen­ter, pod­caster and com­men­ta­tor has a suit­case check­list for ev­ery pos­si­ble sce­nario.

MY PACK­ING STYLE IS …

If I’m trav­el­ling for leisure, I’m com­par­a­tively dis­or­gan­ised and more last-minute. For work trips how­ever, I’m hy­per-or­gan­ised. I be­lieve there are two types of lug­gage: hand lug­gage and lost lug­gage. I’m a plat­inum flyer, so I’m al­lowed two carry-on bags – they’re max­i­mum le­gal size and that’s all I take. One con­tains all my elec­tronic stuff to make the gig hap­pen and the sec­ond bag has my two com­put­ers in it. My clothes also go into the com­puter bag.

I PACK FOR A TRIP BY …

Think­ing about where I’m go­ing. In Aus­tralia, you don’t need many clothes. If it’s cold, I walk faster to warm up and I can buy some­thing if I need it. I’ve es­corted trips to Sval­bard, Mon­go­lia and Ti­bet where there aren’t shops on ev­ery cor­ner, so I have to think about what I’m tak­ing there.

ES­SEN­TIALS FOR AN ANTARC­TIC EXPEDITION IN­CLUDE …

Clothes made of nat­u­ral fi­bres that I can layer. You don’t need wa­ter­proof gear in Antarc­tica, as it never ac­tu­ally rains. Dou­ble gloves are es­sen­tial, so you can take the outer layer off and use your fin­gers to ad­just your cam­era or what­ever. A cam­era and back-up cam­era gear is su­per-im­por­tant. I al­ways take spare cam­era bat­ter­ies too.

A ‘JUST IN CASE’ ITEM IS …

Sea­sick­ness medication. I don’t get sea­sick usu­ally, but you never know. Gin­ger works to a de­gree, but there’s a drug called On­dansetron which is ex­cel­lent. You can’t buy it in Aus­tralia with­out a script but you can buy it over-the-counter at Sin­ga­pore Air­port.

MY LUG­GAGE IS …

Good quality and from Sam­sonite. One has wheels and a hard case, the other is a pi­lot or nav bag style.

MY OUT­FIT WHEN I TRAVEL …

On work trips, I wear a cor­po­rate suit, bright shirt and dress shoes. My clothes are 100 per cent nat­u­ral fi­bres, in­clud­ing closed-in leather shoes, in case there’s a fire – syn­thetic fi­bres melt into your skin. They also don’t breathe, so they make you sweat, which is re­ally bad in Antarc­tica, be­cause you can end up dy­ing if you get wet and then cold.

I NEVER BOARD WITH­OUT …

A book or a sci­ence jour­nal, noise re­duc­tion head­phones and emer­gency T-shirt, undies and socks. For the past 10 years, I’ve car­ried a gas mask on flights. It’s the size of a cig­a­rette packet but only about 3mm thick. It has a char­coal fil­ter to ab­sorb fumes and smoke, giv­ing me enough time to get out in an emer­gency.

EXPEDITION PACK­ING HACKS …

Bag ev­ery­thing to make items wa­ter­proof so there’s no drama if any­thing leaks. Also, carry toi­let pa­per in your pocket – you never know when or where you’ll need it!

AS TOLD TO PAUL EWART

DR KARL WILL ES­CORT AN 11-DAY ANTARC­TIC CRUISE IN NOVEM­BER 2019 FOR WORLD EX­PE­DI­TIONS

PIC­TURES: WORLD EX­PE­DI­TIONS, KYLE SU­PER

Dr Karl says clothes made from nat­u­ral fi­bres are es­sen­tial on an Antarc­tic expedition such as with MV Ortelius.

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