REM­EDY FOR STEREO­TYPES

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - TV Guide - - Don't Miss This Week... -

SPEAK­ING to star, Fred­die High­more (pic­tured) on a pro­mo­tional visit to Syd­ney proved a rare ex­pe­ri­ence: a young star of huge ta­lent, seem­ingly de­void of ego, but with the kind of in­tel­li­gence and em­pa­thy fans see trans­lated on the screen in his role as autis­tic sur­geon, Shaun Mur­phy.

Rather than a plot twist, the Bri­tish ac­tor sees the chance to ex­plore a char­ac­ter be­yond what is on the page; an op­por­tu­nity to break down bound­aries for those on the spec­trum.

“It was about coun­ter­ing this stereo­type that peo­ple with autism are some­how emo­tion­less or de­void of em­pa­thy. [Cre­ator] David Shore con­vinced me from the very be­gin­ning, and this is sad that it needs to be said, but Shaun wasn’t a stereo­type and he’s a very warm hu­man, who we’re go­ing to see fall in love and make mis­takes. In short, he’s a com­plex char­ac­ter and it was a chal­lenge to build that out from the very be­gin­ning.”

Ar­riv­ing at sea­son two, we see Shaun face re­sis­tance when it comes to his pro­posed treat­ment of a home­less pa­tient; while he’s still com­ing to terms with health cri­sis of his men­tor, Dr Glass­man (Richard Schiff).

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