YOUR QUES­TIONS AN­SWERED

WHAT’S YOUR TOP AD­VICE FOR SE­CUR­ING A NEW JOB THIS NEW YEAR?

The Weekend Post - - Careers - email ques­tions to ca­reer­[email protected]

DAR­REN BUCHANAN MAN­AG­ING DI­REC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

You’ll need to pro­vide hir­ing man­agers with ev­i­dence that you per­formed your pre­vi­ous jobs well. It is your achieve­ments and re­sults that count, so add suc­cess met­rics and ex­am­ples to your CV and on­line pro­fes­sional pro­file as proof. By prov­ing your strengths, you’ll bring your suc­cesses front and cen­tre. For ex­am­ple, rather than writ­ing you are “in­no­va­tive”, write that you “de­signed and de­liv­ered a new on­line sales book­ing sys­tem that in­creased sales by 15 per cent in the first six months”. By pro­vid­ing ex­plicit ex­am­ples of suc­cesses, you prove that you have the abil­ity to suc­ceed in a new role.

SINEAD HOURIGAN BRIS­BANE DI­REC­TOR, ROBERT WAL­TERS

Firstly, you should spend some time re­flect­ing on what you have en­joyed most about your cur­rent job, what your great­est achieve­ments have been in the role and what your frus­tra­tions were. You need to spend the time on this so that you don’t end up leav­ing one role for some­thing al­most iden­ti­cal. Once you have iden­ti­fied what it is you are look­ing for, then it’s time to start the search. Def­i­nitely spend the time on your re­sume and en­sure that it is clean, ac­cu­rate and pro­fes­sional. Then, get your alerts set up on your favourite job search en­gines and keep an eye on the news sites for suitable ad­verts.

JULIE FORD SE­NIOR EX­EC­U­TIVE CON­SUL­TANT, McARTHUR

First, know ex­actly what you want to do. The New Year is a great time to reeval­u­ate your life. No job search will be suc­cess­ful if you take a scat­ter­gun ap­proach. If pos­si­ble, search for a job that matches your pas­sions or in­ter­ests and is aligned with your skills, qual­i­fi­ca­tions and ex­pe­ri­ence. Iden­tify com­pa­nies that you as­pire to work with and take it from there. De­velop your net­work, ask for re­fer­rals and do re­search. If you are look­ing in a com­pletely new field, be pre­pared that it may take time. Above all, stay fo­cused on what you want to do, but keep an open mind.

DR NERIDA HILLBERG DI­REC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FER­RIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

I rec­om­mend the 3 P’s: per­se­ver­ance, pa­tience, and pos­i­tiv­ity. Se­cur­ing a new role is a stress­ful and time-con­sum­ing process. Keep­ing an op­ti­mistic per­spec­tive is key. Use your net­works. A re­fer­ral or rec­om­men­da­tion can go a long way in pro­gress­ing you to a short­list. In­clude quan­tifi­able achieve­ments in your CV rather than a list of re­spon­si­bil­i­ties. Proof­read all writ­ten cor­re­spon­dence care­fully to make sure your email in­quiries, CV, and cov­er­ing let­ters are all er­ror-free.

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