The Weekly Advertiser Horsham

Water excites but loses its oomph

- – Dean Lawson

Water flowing into a previously dry Lake Hindmarsh from a flowing Wimmera River provided a mini tourism attraction at Jeparit before the state went into the latest lockdown.

Water continues to pool in the mouth of the lake as a result of rain in the upper catchment, with millions of litres establishi­ng a mini ‘lake within a lake’.

Flow rates have steadily slowed since water initially tipped over Jeparit weir, but the river was still flowing strongly when The Weekly Advertiser’s Paul Carracher joined a stream of curious onlookers last week.

Jeparit’s Ebony Spokes, who experience­d summers at a full Lake Hindmarsh and on the

Wimmera River in her youth, said seeing the water flowing into the lake was ‘fantastic’. “We used to camp at the lake for two weeks during summer when I was little,” she said.

“I also had a friend who lived across the river so I would swim across to her and we would go canoeing and be out on weekends and after school when it was hot. It was great.

“It’s fantastic to see the water come through. It’s a pity there’s not a bit more to fill the lake up so I could enjoy all the experience­s again – with my kids.

“I work at the local chemist and also in Rainbow and the amount of people who were coming in and saying they had come for a drive to have a look at the lake and the weir was amazing.”

Lake Hindmarsh and Lake Albacutya to its north are the two major terminal lakes of the Wimmera River system.

Spanning 135 square kilometres, Lake Hindmarsh can hold 378 gigalitres of water at a maximum depth of about 3.65 metres and is highly susceptibl­e to evaporatio­n.

On rare occasions when full it overflows into Outlet Creek to become the primary water source for Lake Albacutya.

It last came close to filling during 2011 floods.

 ?? Picture: WIMMERA CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY ?? HOW THINGS CHANGE: millennium drought.
The Wimmera River at Jeparit in 2009 at the height of the
Picture: WIMMERA CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY HOW THINGS CHANGE: millennium drought. The Wimmera River at Jeparit in 2009 at the height of the

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