So­cial me­dia can feed our in­se­cu­ri­ties

The Western Star - - Life -

SO­CIAL me­dia can be a huge life­line for many moth­ers. It has been a god­send for those ge­o­graph­i­cally iso­lated, and even those just con­fined to their home with new­borns, sick kids or a lim­ited sup­port sys­tem.

But a re­cent study per­formed by Re­fin­ery29.com has re­vealed so­cial me­dia can have an ad­verse im­pact on the way we see our­selves as par­ents.

The study sur­veyed 500 Cana­dian women about moth­er­hood and so­cial me­dia. It re­vealed apps like In­sta­gram, Face­book and Twit­ter made moth­ers feel in­se­cure.

A whop­ping 82 per cent of moth­ers com­pared them­selves to other mums on­line and 69 per cent said they had in­se­cu­ri­ties about moth­er­hood as a re­sult of so­cial me­dia.

The sur­vey found 39 per cent of mums saw them­selves as not liv­ing up to ex­pec­ta­tions of their post-baby body in com­par­i­son to other mums, while 38 per cent saw other fam­i­lies as hav­ing more fun than their own.

It was de­ter­mined that one in four women posted pho­tos of their chil­dren on so­cial me­dia every day. Sadly, 52 per cent of moth­ers aged 18-35 ad­mit­ted they no­ticed when friends didn’t “like” pho­tos of their chil­dren.

www.kidspot.com.au

Pic­ture: iS­tock

KEEP­ING WATCH: Mums post pho­tos of their chil­dren to keep fam­ily and friends up­dated, but how many ‘likes’ the im­ages get can be a cause of con­cern for some.

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