HOW TO START YOUR CAR AF­TER A LAY-UP

AND HOW TO TRACK DOWN THE PROB­LEM IF IT FAILS TO CO­OP­ER­ATE

Unique Cars - - WORKSHOP BASICS -

WHEN YOU THROW open your shed doors to wake up a clas­sic that’s been lan­guish­ing for a lengthy pe­riod, don’t be sur­prised if the car dis­plays less en­thu­si­asm for the start-up plan than you. Ma­chin­ery hates to lie un­used for long pe­ri­ods. Achiev­ing suc­cess on the first start-up is there­fore likely to re­quire a bit of ex­tra ef­fort on your part.

This guide cov­ers the ba­sics of start­ing a laid-up car and ex­plains what to do if it fails to play ball. It should also come in handy if your car sud­denly de­cides not to start in any sit­u­a­tion through­out the year.

The ba­sic prin­ci­ples of an in­ter­nal com­bus­tion en­gine are pretty sim­ple. A cylin­der will fire if it has fuel, a spark de­liv­ered at the right time and com­pres­sion. If it doesn’t fire, you just need to iden­tif y which of these in­gre­di­ents is miss­ing, then work out why it’s miss­ing.

We’re as­sum­ing the en­gine turns over in the first place. If turn­ing the key brings a fee­ble click or a deathly si­lence, check the bat­tery con­di­tion, the leads and con­nec­tions to the bat­ter y and starter, and all ma­jor earth con­nec­tions. Tap the starter smartly with a heav y ham­mer to jolt stuck car­bon brushes into ac­tion.

Re­mem­ber to give the car a thor­ough once-over be­fore roar­ing tri­umphantly onto the street. At the ver y least, check all f luid lev­els, make sure all the lights work, care­fully in­spect the brak­ing sys­tem and check the tyre pres­sures. Un­der­take a cou­ple of short trips first, keep­ing your eyes and ears open for any­thing pe­cu­liar.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.