Food The eater­ies cre­at­ing unique food ex­pe­ri­ences.

There is in­ven­tive cook­ing, and then there are res­tau­rants so in­spired they rein­vent the con­cept of what it means to eat well.

Virgin Australia Voyeur - - NOVEMBER - Words LIAM PIEPER

“The any­thing-goes ap­proach is still alive and din­ers still flock to get a taste of this unique din­ing ex­pe­ri­ence.”

NOMA, COPEN­HAGEN

Es­tab­lished in Copen­hagen in 2003, Noma changed ev­ery­thing. Head chef Rene Redzepi’s wildly in­ven­tive take on tra­di­tional Nordic food, his cham­pi­oning of hy­per-lo­cal and rare in­gre­di­ents, cooked in ways both play­ful and tech­ni­cally bril­liant — rein­deer steak served along­side can­died moss; a wild duck egg cooked in hay oil at the ta­ble — made Noma a by­word for in­no­va­tion.

Then, in De­cem­ber 2017 Noma closed, aban­don­ing its two Miche­lin stars and nu­mer­ous awards. Af­ter a year’s rest, which in­cluded a stint of pop-ups around the world (Syd­ney in­cluded) it re-opened a mile down the road, start­ing from scratch. The new Noma cy­cles through three menus: seafood, vege­tar­ian and game. The any­thing-goes ap­proach is still alive — the seafood menu fea­tures sea cu­cum­ber, face of cod and fish sperm — and din­ers still flock to get a taste of this unique din­ing ex­pe­ri­ence.

COVINO, VENICE

Venice can be a mixed bag for the hun­gry trav­eller, and of­ten your ex­pe­ri­ence will de­pend on your state of mind. At times it’s the most ro­man­tic city in the world. At oth­ers, it’s drown­ing, lit­er­ally, un­der the weight of tourists’ ex­pec­ta­tions.

One place that will meet — and beat — all pre­con­ceived no­tions is CoVino, a tiny os­te­ria with room ( just) for five ta­bles. Owner An­drea Loren­zon and chef Dim­itri Gris are pas­sion­ate about their food and wine

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