‘MY MUM DE­SERVED BET­TER’

The son of mur­dered Air­lie Beach grand­mother Dorothy Brit­ton’s heart­break­ing plea for an­swers

Whitsunday Times - - FRONT PAGE - Scott Sawyer

THE son of slain Air­lie Beach grand­mother Dorothy Brit­ton has spo­ken pub­licly for the first time in a plea for help to solve his mother’s bru­tal mur­der.

Mrs Brit­ton, 48, was found dead in her Tim­ber­land Road, Ju­bilee Pocket home at Air­lie Beach 22 years ago.

Mr Brit­ton read a Bi­ble verse dur­ing this week’s press con­fer­ence in Townsville and asked for any­one with in­for­ma­tion that may lead to the ar­rest of his mother’s mur­derer to come for­ward.

He and his brother had moved away from Air­lie Beach, un­able to re­main there as they were sus­pi­cious of ev­ery­one.

THE son of slain Air­lie Beach grand­mother Dorothy Brit­ton has spo­ken pub­licly for the first time in a plea for help to solve his mother’s bru­tal mur­der.

Adrian Brit­ton made a tear­ful call for as­sis­tance to help end the 22-year-old cold-case mys­tery and give his fam­ily the truth.

Mrs Brit­ton, 48, was found dead in her Tim­ber­land Rd, Ju­bilee Pocket home at Air­lie Beach on March 7, 1996.

She died from a sin­gle gun­shot wound to the head, be­lieved to have been fired by a sin­gle-bar­rel shot­gun.

The mur­der weapon was never re­cov­ered.

Mrs Brit­ton was last seen alive about noon on March 6, 22 years ago.

Af­ter fam­ily had been un­able to con­tact her, a daugh­ter-in-law vis­ited her home the next day and found her body.

Mr Brit­ton read a Bi­ble verse dur­ing this week’s press con­fer­ence in Townsville and asked for any­one with in­for­ma­tion that may lead to the ar­rest of his mother’s mur­derer to come for­ward.

“She de­served bet­ter,” Mr Brit­ton said.

He and his brother had moved away from Air­lie Beach, un­able to re­main there as they were sus­pi­cious of ev­ery­one and still had no clo­sure.

“We want an­swers,” Mr Brit­ton said.

“I’m pre­pared to wait un­til eter­nity.”

De­tec­tives last week made in­quiries in South Aus­tralia and North Queens­land about the un­solved homi­cide.

Townsville Crime Ser­vices Group de­tec­tive Act­ing In­spec­tor Phil Watts said in­ves­ti­ga­tors were con­fi­dent about where their in­quiries were headed.

He said in­ves­ti­ga­tors be­lieved the per­son re­spon­si­ble had been fa­mil­iar with Mrs Brit­ton’s life­style and move­ments and had been fa­mil­iar with her pet rot­tweiler, which had been known to be ag­gres­sive.

Neigh­bours had not re­ported hear­ing her dog bark­ing around the time of her mur­der.

Homi­cide In­ves­ti­ga­tion Unit de­tec­tive Se­nior Con­sta­ble Dar­ren Mills de­scribed it as a “hor­ri­ble crime” and said in­ves­ti­ga­tors would be re­lent­less in their bid to solve it.

“It is never too late to come for­ward,” he said.

A State Govern­ment re­ward of $250,000 has been is­sued for in­for­ma­tion that leads to the ar­rest and con­vic­tion of the per­son or per­sons re­spon­si­ble for the mur­der.

An in­dem­nity has also been of­fered against pros­e­cu­tion for any ac­com­plice, not be­ing the per­son who ac­tu­ally com­mit­ted the mur­der, who first pro­vides the in­for­ma­tion.

“It is never too late to come for­ward.

— Homi­cide In­ves­ti­ga­tion Unit De­tec­tive Se­nior Con­sta­ble

Dar­ren Mills

PHOTO: QUEENS­LAND PO­LICE

UN­SOLVED: Dorothy Brit­ton.

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