Woman’s Day (Australia)

Port Arthur mas­sacre

- Crime · Incidents · Finland · Peru · Australia · Port Arthur

Those chill­ing, smil­ing eyes and the way he stastalked his ter­ri­fied vicvic­tims with glee wwill for­ever be rere­mem­bered. In 1996, Martin Bbryant hap­pily sat ddown to lunch at a cafe lo­cated at Ttas­ma­nia’s his­toric ppe­nal colony, Port Arthur. When he fin­ished his lunch, his true in­ten­tions be­came ap­par­ent. He pulled a ssemi-au­to­matic ri­fle from frofrom hhis bag and be­gan sh shoot­ing peo­ple, hunt­ing t them down and killing tthem at close range. By the time he was fi fi­nally ap­pre­hended t the next morning, 35 pe peo­ple were dead and 23 wwere wounded.

Lynne Beavis,s, a nurse and eye­wit­ness saidd shortly af­ter, “Be­ing a nurse,e, I’ve seen dead peo­ple, I’ve seen blood. Bu­tut what I saw in there, no­body but per­haps a sol­dier would know what it was like.”

Bryant’s killing­ing spree was the coun­try’s worst mas­sacre. It led to the chang­ing of gun laws in Aus­tralia and a na­tion­wide buy­back scheme that saw more than 640,000 weapons handed in to the au­thor­i­ties.

Bryant had var­i­ous in­tel­lec­tual dis­abil­i­ties, and is cur­rently serv­ing 35 life sen­tences with­out pa­role.

 ??  ?? Spe­cial ops at­tend the scene. A me­mo­rial cross at Port Arthur bears the names of Bryant’s vic­tims. Re­mains of guest­house burnt by Bryant in his fi­nal stand.
Spe­cial ops at­tend the scene. A me­mo­rial cross at Port Arthur bears the names of Bryant’s vic­tims. Re­mains of guest­house burnt by Bryant in his fi­nal stand.

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