6 WAYS TO KEEP FOOD FRESH

Nu­tri­tion­ist KATE SPINA and kitchen guru CAS­SAN­DRA SAKLEY on stack­ing the fridge

Woman’s Day (Australia) - - Health -

1 MIND THE MILK

The warm­est part of fh the fridge is the worst place for foods prone to go­ing off, such as milk. In­stead, make the door home to condi­ments, wa­ter and wine. These items of­ten have preser­va­tives so are less likely to cause food poi­son­ing. But they don’t last for­ever, so if your tomato chut­ney was best be­fore 2015, ditch it.

2 CENTRESTAGE

The tem­per­a­ture is con­sis­tently cooler on the mid­dle shelf so this is where your milk, yo­ghurt, but­ter and cheese should live. Store your eggs here and keep them in the car­ton – it pro­tects them from strong odours and tem­per­a­ture fluc­tu­a­tions.

3 RE­DUCE RISK

The bot­tom shelf has less risk of drip­ping down onto other foods and is gen­er­ally the cold­est. This makes it the best place for high-risk foods such as raw meat, chicken and fish. Al­ways keep these foods wrapped or in con­tain­ers to pre­vent cross-con­tam­i­na­tion.

4 STAY CRISP

The crisper drawer main­tains a higher hu­mid­ity to pre­vent your let­tuce go­ing limp. Store your fruit and veg­eta­bles in here, with the ex­cep­tion of ap­ples. They give off a gas called eth­yl­ene, which can cause some veg­eta­bles to spoil more rapidly.

5 GIVE IT SPACE

An over­crowded fridge means you may lose track of what you have, lead­ing to ex­pired prod­ucts and even buy­ing foods you al­ready have. Min­imise waste and in­crease food us­age by only buy­ing what you need for that week.

6 GET OR­GAN­ISED

Group sim­i­lar items on the same shelf, such as putting dairy prod­ucts to­gether, and all sauces in one place. It’ll be quicker to find what you need, re­duc­ing in­de­ci­sion. Plus, ar­rang­ing fruit and ve­g­ies in the colours of the rain­bow can make them more en­tic­ing to eat!

Kate Spina Cas­san­dra Sakley

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