Gar­den­ing Sum­mer gar­den­ing myths busted

Hor­ti­cul­tur­ist and Victa am­bas­sador ADAM WOODHAMS clears up com­mon yard­work fact and fic­tion

Woman’s Day (Australia) - - Contents -

LEAVE THE GRASS LENGTH LONGER IN SUM­MER

“Cut­ting the grass too short, es­pe­cially in warmer weather, cre­ates scalped spots and it leaves the run­ners and roots more vul­ner­a­ble to dam­age from the heat,” says Adam. “This then leads to patchy spots cre­at­ing the ideal sit­u­a­tion for lawn weeds to grow.”

GRASS CLIP­PINGS SHOULD BE LEFT ON THE LAWN

This de­pends ono your mower equip­ment. “Qual­ity, mod­ern­mode mow­ers fea­ture mulchmow­ing­mow­ing tech­n­tech­nol­ogy. This cuts grass to a su­per-fine state and blows it back into the turf thatch. He­here, these su­per-fine grass clip­pings will in­su­latein the grass roots from hot weather aand work as mi­cro-mulch, re­tain­ing mois­tu­mois­ture,” says Adam. “Clip­pings from a mower with­out a mulching op­tion should be caught in the catcher and added to com­post or spread thinly on gar­den beds as mulch.”

WA­TER­ING IN THE EVENING IS BET­TER THAN MORN­ING

Ac­cord­ing to Adam, wa­ter­ing in the evening – par­tic­u­larly af­ter a hot day – causes ex­cess evap­o­ra­tion. “This in turn raises hu­mid­ity around the plants or lawn overnight, in­creas­ing the risk of fun­gal prob­lems and rots,” he adds. In­stead, wa­ter in the early morn­ing. “This way soil has cooled down... and your plants can charge them­selves up, re­hy­drat­ing for the day ahead.”

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