CAN HOLD­ING A GRUDGE RE­ALLY HURT YOUR HEALTH?

Women's Health Australia - - ASK WOMEN’S HEALTH -

AN­SWER

Ab­so­lutely! Neg­a­tive emo­tions can quickly kick­start a de­struc­tive cy­cle.

They lead to bio­chem­i­cal changes such as an in­crease in cor­ti­sol (the stress hor­mone), which in­ter­feres with your body’s nat­u­ral heal­ing mech­a­nism, which leads to less self-care (such as ex­er­cise), which cre­ates phys­i­cal pain, which leads to more dark emo­tions, which may re­sult in poor life­style choices, which can cause low self-es­teem ... and so on, and on and on. “The good news is that if you’re able to ac­knowl­edge that you are hold­ing a grudge, you’re half­way to re­leas­ing it,” says Vicky Vla­cho­nis, os­teopath and pain ex­pert. “To fully let it go, try a for­give­ness med­i­ta­tion.” A what? Each night in a quiet room with your eyes closed, re­peat this as of­ten as you need, ei­ther out loud or to your­self: “I forgive those who have wronged me. I forgive my­self. I let go of all anger, re­sent­ment and pain. I wel­come an abun­dance of love, peace and joy. Thank you mind, thank you body.” Do this every night un­til you feel you no longer need it. “Even if you don’t reach 100 per cent for­give­ness, just re­peat­ing the words helps,” says Vla­cho­nis. When you’re in doubt, just med­i­tate it out.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.