What did they say again?

English is rich in id­iomatic ex­pres­sions — and us­ing them can make your lan­guage sound au­then­tic and up to date. You can learn some of them in these short ex­tracts.

Business Spotlight - - CONTENTS -

First, the id­iomatic way

So­phie: Did you get hold of

Mark?

Jules: I’ve tried, but it’s his day off.

I’ve been play­ing phone tag with

him all af­ter­noon.

So­phie: We need to bring him up to speed to­day.

Now, more sim­ply

So­phie: Did you con­tact Mark? Jules: I’ve tried, but he’s on hol­i­day to­day. I’ve called him, left a mes­sage, he called me back, left a mes­sage, again and again all af­ter­noon.

So­phie: We need to give him the lat­est in­for­ma­tion to­day. get hold of sb. ifml. jmdn. er­re­ichen day off: be sb.’s ~ jmds. freier Tag sein play phone tag with sb. US ifml. hin und her tele­fonieren, ohne jmdn. zu er­re­ichen (play tag with sb. mit jmdm. Fan­gen spie­len) bring sb. up to speed ifml. jmdn. auf den neuesten Stand brin­gen

First, the id­iomatic way

So­phie: Hey, Mark, thanks for touch­ing base to­day.

Mark: Stop beat­ing about the bush. What’s wrong?

So­phie: You haven’t heard any­thing through the grapevine?

Now, more sim­ply

So­phie: Hey, Mark, thanks for con­tact­ing us to­day.

Mark: Stop avoid­ing talk­ing di­rectly about the prob­lem. What’s wrong?

So­phie: You haven’t heard any­thing from any­one else? touch base (with sb.) jmdn. kon­tak­tieren beat about the bush um den heißen Brei herum­re­den through the grapevine: hear sth. ~ ifml. etw. aus der Gerüchteküche hören

First, the id­iomatic way

So­phie: In a nut­shell, this means that Ge­orge will leave the team this Fri­day. Can you get on board with that?

Mark: Ab­so­lutely. Hon­estly, I had to bite my tongue dur­ing the meet­ing last week. He was to­tally

out of line. I sup­port you.

So­phie: Great!

Now, more sim­ply

So­phie: In just a few sim­ple words, this means that Ge­orge will leave the team this Fri­day. Are you OK with that?

Mark: Ab­so­lutely. Hon­estly, I had to stop my­self from say­ing some­thing dur­ing the meet­ing last week. He be­haved very badly. I sup­port you.

So­phie: Great!

First, the id­iomatic way

Mark: So, So­phie re­ally does call the tune!

Jules: Yes, and Ge­orge re­ally dropped the ball. He should never have pointed the fin­ger at So­phie for his own mis­takes.

Mark: True. Keep me posted if there are any other changes. I’ll be back on Mon­day.

Now, more sim­ply

Mark: So, So­phie re­ally is in con­trol!

Jules: Yes, and Ge­orge re­ally failed to do the things he was sup­posed to. He should never have blamed So­phie for his own mis­takes. Mark: True. Tell me if there are any other changes. I’ll be back on Mon­day. in a nut­shell kurz gesagt, in aller Kürze get on board with sth. mit etw. zurechtkom­men bite one’s tongue ifml. sich auf die Zunge beißen out of line: be ~ ifml. aus der Reihe tanzen, sich schlecht benehmen call the tune das Heft in der Hand haben drop the ball UK ifml. Mist bauen point the fin­ger at sb. mit dem Fin­ger auf jmdn. zeigen keep sb. posted jmdn. auf dem Laufenden hal­ten

Through the grapevine!

Who dropped the ball now?

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