Chair­man: Ar­me­ni­ans of oc­cu­pied NagornoKarabakh want to live within Azer­bai­jan

Azer News - - Front Page - By Ab­dul Ker­imkhanov

Armenia, hav­ing seized for­eign lands, could not di­gest these con­quests. Oc­cu­pied Azer­bai­jani lands are empty. Karabakh Ar­me­ni­ans, tired of poverty, law­less­ness and ex­pec­ta­tions of war, pre­fer to flee from Karabakh wher­ever they look, but not at all at the cap­tured lands. It is quite un­der­stand­able be­cause what is left for them to do when the con­flict does not find its so­lu­tion, but only takes lives...

Armenia, hav­ing seized for­eign lands, could not di­gest these con­quests. Oc­cu­pied Azer­bai­jani lands are empty. Karabakh Ar­me­ni­ans, tired of poverty, law­less­ness and ex­pec­ta­tions of war, pre­fer to flee from Karabakh wher­ever they look, but not at all at the cap­tured lands. It is quite un­der­stand­able be­cause what is left for them to do when the con­flict does not find its so­lu­tion, but only takes lives...

Azer­bai­jan at all lev­els has re­peat­edly stated that the whole re­gion will be lib­er­ated, peace­fully or mil­i­tar­ily. In case of con­flict set­tle­ment by peace­ful means, Baku is ready to grant wide au­ton­omy to NagornoKarabakh and se­cure the civil rights of the lo­cal Ar­me­nian pop­u­la­tion. But for that, Armenia should un­con­di­tion­ally with­draw its oc­cu­pa­tion troops from the ter­ri­tory of Azer­bai­jan, the ter­ri­to­rial in­tegrity and sovereignty of Azer­bai­jan should be re­stored, refugees and dis­placed per­sons re­turned to their homes.

Bayram Sa­farov, Chair­man of theAzer­bai­jani com­mu­nity of the Nagorno-Karabakh re­gion of Azer­bai­jan pub­lic as­so­ci­a­tion de­clared that Ar­me­ni­ans liv­ing in oc­cu­pied Nagorno-Karabakh want to live ac­cord­ing to the laws of Azer­bai­jan, be­cause Azer­bai­jan is a strong, de­vel­op­ing coun­try where so­cial wel­fare is at a high level.

If the Ar­me­ni­ans of Karabakh want to live to­gether with the Azer­bai­ja­nis, they must have an iden­tity card of Azer­bai­jan, if they do not want this, then let them go to Armenia and live there, he stressed.

Sa­farov noted that for many years the sit­u­a­tion in Armenia has been tense.

More­over, he added that be­fore the elec­tion of the new gov­ern­ment in the oc­cu­py­ing coun­try, the sit­u­a­tion will be un­sta­ble, and af­ter the elec­tion other pro­cesses will be­gin. Ar­me­ni­ans will con­tinue to sort things out be­cause of the author­ity. It might be easy to come to power, but keep­ing it yet an un­easy task. Es­pe­cially, for Nikol Pashinyan, who has not any ex­pe­ri­ence in pub­lic ad­min­is­tra­tion. Un­til now, the com­mon peo­ple in Armenia have fallen vic­tim to a crim­i­nal pol­icy. Ev­ery year thou­sands of peo­ple leave Armenia. Armenia is ac­tu­ally not a coun­try, but an out­post, said Sa­farov.

Sa­farov be­lieves that re­gard­less of who comes to power, the only way to save Armenia from so­cial and eco­nomic prob­lems is to aban­don its ag­gres­sive pol­icy.

Sa­farov also said that Azer­bai­jan will never ac­cept the oc­cu­pa­tion of its lands and will not give up the strug­gle for the lib­er­a­tion of these lands.

"As a re­sult of suc­cess­ful state pol­icy, diplo­matic ad­van­tage is on our side. Azer­bai­jan’s ter­ri­to­rial in­tegrity is sup­ported in­ter­na­tion­ally, Nagorno-Karabakh is rec­og­nized as a ter­ri­tory of Azer­bai­jan. Such a large coun­try like Ger­many re­cently said this, which also con­firms my words," Sa­farov con­cluded.

The con­flict be­tween the two South Cau­ca­sus coun­tries be­gan in 1988 when Armenia made ter­ri­to­rial claims against Azer­bai­jan. As a re­sult of the en­su­ing war, in 1992 Ar­me­nian armed forces oc­cu­pied 20 per­cent of Azer­bai­jan, in­clud­ing the Nagorno-Karabakh re­gion and seven sur­round­ing dis­tricts.

As a re­sult of Armenia's armed in­va­sion into Azer­bai­jan's le­gal ter­ri­tory, the two neigh­bor­ing coun­tries have re­mained locked in a bit­ter ter­ri­to­rial dis­pute over the Nagorno-Karabakh re­gion, which Armenia-backed sep­a­ratists seized from Azer­bai­jan in a bloody war in the early 1990s.

The 1994 cease­fire agree­ment was fol­lowed by peace ne­go­ti­a­tions. Armenia has not yet im­ple­mented four UN Se­cu­rity Coun­cil res­o­lu­tions on with­drawal of its armed forces from the Nagorno-Karabakh and the sur­round­ing dis­tricts.

De­spite Baku's best ef­forts, peace in the oc­cu­pied lands re­mains a mi­rage in the dis­tance as Armenia re­fuses to com­ply with in­ter­na­tional law.

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