Ger­man Con­sul: EU should par­tic­i­pate in ne­go­ti­a­tions on Nagorno-Karabakh

Azer News - - Front Page - By Ab­dul Ker­imkhanov

The Euro­pean Union (EU) should par­tic­i­pate in the ne­go­ti­a­tions on the set­tle­ment of the Ar­me­nian-Azer­bai­jani Nagorno-Karabakh con­flict, Hon­orary Con­sul of Azer­bai­jan in Stuttgart (Ger­many) Otto Hauser told Trend.

The Euro­pean Union (EU) should par­tic­i­pate in the ne­go­ti­a­tions on the set­tle­ment of the Ar­me­nian-Azer­bai­jani Nagorno-Karabakh con­flict, Hon­orary Con­sul of Azer­bai­jan in Stuttgart (Ger­many) Otto Hauser told Trend.

He de­clared that Azer­bai­jan is an im­por­tant part­ner for Europe, and this part­ner­ship should be mu­tu­ally ben­e­fi­cial. "In the end, Azer­bai­jan sup­plies oil to Europe, and in the fu­ture - gas,” he stressed.

En­sur­ing the right of Azer­bai­ja­nis to re­turn to Nagorno-Karabakh and to other oc­cu­pied ter­ri­to­ries should be the first step in re­solv­ing the con­flict, he added.

He un­der­lined that NagornoKarabakh is the ter­ri­tory of Azer­bai­jan, and there is no doubt about it. "Azer­bai­jani in­ter­nally dis­placed per­sons should be able to re­turn to their homes," hon­orary con­sul added.

Hauser also noted the im­por­tance of the im­ple­men­ta­tion of four res­o­lu­tions of the UN Se­cu­rity Coun­cil on the with­drawal of Ar­me­nian armed forces from NagornoKarabakh and ad­ja­cent re­gions.

“This is the will of the in­ter­na­tional com­mu­nity,” he stressed.

Hauser con­sid­ered that steps need to be taken to build con­fi­dence since they con­trib­ute to en­hanc­ing the ne­go­ti­a­tion process.

Ear­lier, Ger­man Chan­cel­lor An­gela Merkel dur­ing the Ger­manUkrainian Eco­nomic Fo­rum in Ber­lin stated that Ger­many can­not close its eyes to the fact that be­cause of the frozen con­flicts, the coun­tries of the for­mer Soviet Union can­not de­velop in the way they want it.

She noted that coun­tries such as Ge­or­gia, Moldova, Azer­bai­jan, Ar­me­nia and Ukraine can­not de­velop be­cause of frozen con­flicts in South Os­se­tia, Transnis­tria, NagornoKarabakh and in the east of Ukraine. "Ger­many can­not close eyes to the fact that coun­tries around Rus­sia, in­clud­ing Moldova, can­not de­velop the way they want it," said An­gela Merkel.

The con­flict be­tween the two South Cau­ca­sus coun­tries be­gan in 1988 when Ar­me­nia made ter­ri­to­rial claims against Azer­bai­jan. As a re­sult of the en­su­ing war, in 1992 Ar­me­nian armed forces oc­cu­pied 20 per­cent of Azer­bai­jan, in­clud­ing the Nagorno-Karabakh re­gion and seven sur­round­ing dis­tricts.

The 1994 cease­fire agree­ment was fol­lowed by peace ne­go­ti­a­tions. Ar­me­nia has not yet im­ple­mented four UN Se­cu­rity Coun­cil res­o­lu­tions on with­drawal of its armed forces from the Nagorno-Karabakh and the sur­round­ing dis­tricts.

De­spite Baku's best ef­forts, peace in the oc­cu­pied lands re­mains a mi­rage in the dis­tance as Ar­me­nia re­fuses to com­ply with in­ter­na­tional law.

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