Pol­ish ar­chi­tec­tures in Baku

Azeri Observer - - Azeri Observer - BY NI­HAD YAGUBLU AZ­ERI OB­SERVER CON­TRIB­U­TOR

J ózef Plośko gained his pro­fes­sional skills at St.Peters­burg In­sti­tute of Civil En­gi­neers . Af­ter grad­u­a­tion in 1895 , and hav­ing worked in Kiev for two years he came to Baku at the in­vi­ta­tion of Jozef Goslawski . Plośko took place of lo­cal ar­chi­tect at con­struc­tion depart­ment of the Baku city ad­min­is­tra­tion.

Since the end of 19th cen­tury, so many Pol­ish peo­ple had been moved to Azer­bai­jan. Ac­tu­ally, these were the peo­ple who were fight­ing against the colo­nial pol­icy of Tsarist Rus­sia, and they were forced to ex­ile. In the be­gin­ning of the 20th, the first Pol­ish or­ga­ni­za­tion was es­tab­lished. In Azer­bai­jan, lots of Pol­ish peo­ple were work­ing in var­i­ous fields. For in­stance, lawyer Stanislav Vonso­vic was a mem­ber of Azer­bai­jan Par­lia­ment in 1918. At that time, Masey Sulke­vic was the mil­i­tary com­man­der in the Azer­bai­jan army. Ad­di­tion­ally, there were many well-known spe­cial­ists like Pavel Po­tot­ski in the branch of oil. Kricin­ski broth­ers that lived in Baku also made re­mark­able con­tri­bu­tions at that time. There were lots of build­ings in Baku which were de­signed by Jozef Goslawski ( 1865- 1904), Kaz­imierz Sko­rewicz (1866-1950) and Józef Plośko (18671931). The build­ings which ones` projects and de­signs were given by Jozef Plozsko are spe­cially dif­fer­ing. All these build­ings still ex­ist today and they are pro­tected.

Is­mai­lya Palace is lo­cated in Baku, the cap­i­tal

city of Azer­bai­jan. This build­ing has spe­cific style that eas­ily dif­fers it­self from other build­ings in there. Ar­chi­tects call this style as Vene­tian Gothic style. The build­ing was con­structed by Pol­ish ar­chi­tect Józef Plośko at the ex­pense of the millionaire Musa Naghiyev in com­mem­o­ra­tion of his de­ceased son Is­mayil, and was named Is­mailiyya af­ter him. Con­struc­tion be­gan in 1908 and ended in 1913. This build­ing was con­structed for the Mus­lim Char­ity So­ci­ety in ad­vance, but it cur­rent- ly serves as the Pre­sid­ium of the Academy of Sciences of Azer­bai­jan.

The Mukhtarov Palace, which is cur­rently called as The Hap­pines Palace or The Wed­ding Palace, was also made by Józef Plośko.

Azer­bai­jan State Pup­pet The­atre named af­ter Ab­dulla Shaig, which was pre­vi­ously known as “Phe­nom­e­non“cinema, was built in 1908-1910 by Józef Plośko.

Józef Plośko gained his pro­fes­sional skills at St.Peters­burg In­sti­tute of Civil En­gi­neers. Af­ter grad­u­a­tion in 1895, and hav­ing worked in Kiev for two years he came to Baku at the in­vi­ta­tion of Jozef Goslawski. Józef Plośko took place of lo­cal ar­chi­tect at con­struc­tion depart­ment of the Baku city ad­min­is­tra­tion. From 1907-1910 Plośko was the chief ar­chi­tect of the cap­i­tal city of Azer­bai­jan. In 1925, af­ter nearly spend­ing 30 years in Azer­bai­jan, he moved to War­saw and then to France.

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