The Hockey News - Money & Power

ANAHEIM DUCKS

HENRY SAMUELI

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AS THE STORY goes, Henry Samueli was a 36-year-old computer and electrical engineerin­g professor at UCLA when he met a graduate student named Henry Nicholas, and they co-founded tech giant Broadcom in 1991. They each kicked in $5,000 and worked out of Nicholas’ home in nearby Redondo Beach, Calif.

In time, they moved the headquarte­rs for their small but growing semiconduc­tor company to Irvine, with a short stopover near the UCLA campus in Westwood. By 1998, they had taken Broadcom public with a listing on the Nasdaq exchange. By 2009, Broadcom was listed on the Fortune 500 list of companies. By 2012, its total revenue was reported as more than $8 billion.

In 2016, Avago Technology bought the Orange County-based chipmaker for $37 billion and renamed it Broadcom Ltd. Samueli retained the title of chief technology officer and Forbes ranked him No. 190 on its most recent list, with a net worth of $3.9 billion.

Samueli and his wife Susan purchased the Anaheim Ducks from the Walt Disney Company for $75 million in 2005. Forbes now lists the franchise’s worth at $460 million. The Ducks won the franchise’s only Stanley Cup in 2007, the Samuelis’ second year of ownership.

Their first steps toward owning the club came when they took over management of the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim (now called the Honda Center).

The Ducks have missed the playoffs only twice since 2005-06 and reached the Western Conference final twice in the past four seasons, establishi­ng a deep connection with a passionate fan base in Orange County,

a wealthy suburban community southeast of Los Angeles.

The Samuelis dropped the ‘Mighty’ from the Disney-owned Ducks nickname after their first season as owners, changed the team colors to black, gold and – with a nod to The OC TV series – orange. Over the years, they establishe­d strong philanthro­pic ties to the community.

They also are committed to growing hockey at the grassroots level in and around Orange County. In 2008, they started the Anaheim Ducks High School Hockey League with only one local team. It has since grown to more than 48 teams across the region.

In addition, the Ducks owners have purchased a number of rinks around the area, including Anaheim Ice, which has been the team’s practice facility since 1994. In January 2019, the team will move its practice headquarte­rs to a new foursheet facility at the Great Park in Irvine.

The Samuelis work closely with Michael Schulman, who serves as CEO of the Ducks, chairman of the board of Anaheim Arena Management LLC and managing director of H&S Ventures LLC. They also consult with Ducks GM Bob Murray on hockey matters.

The couple is often visible at Honda Center, and have honored the club’s history. This season, the Ducks are retiring the No. 9 jersey of Paul Kariya and the No. 27 sweater of Scott Niedermaye­r, joining fellow Hall of Famer Teemu Selanne’s No. 8 in the rafters.

The Samuelis, through the Samueli Foundation, have made donations totalling more than $500 million, mostly in the areas of science and technology. Last year, they donated $200 million to the University of California’s campus in Irvine.

Susan serves on the board of directors of the Orangewood Children’s Foundation and is on the board of trustees at a charter school in Santa Ana that focuses on science and technology education for underserve­d and foster-care youth.

Henry was born in Buffalo, the son of Polish immigrants who arrived in the United States with almost nothing after fleeing Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe during the Second World War. He earned bachelor’s, masters and doctorate degrees in electrical engineerin­g at UCLA.

Susan was born and raised in Los Angeles. She earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematic­s at UC Berkeley and went on to work at IBM as a software programmer. She later became interested in nutrition while raising her three children and has earned advanced degrees in the subject.

Henry and Susan have three children and reside in Newport Beach, Calif. – ELLIOTT TEAFORD

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