WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

DEEP IN THE LUSH FLOR­IDA EVERGLADES, HIGH­WAY NOISE GIVES WAY TO HERON CALLS AND GATOR GROWLS.

Air Canada enRoute - - FLORIDA FOUR WAYS/ LA FLORIDE EN QUATRE TEMPS - BY / PAR CAITLIN STALL-PA­QUET

In the man­groves, canals and marshes of Everglades Na­tional Park, GPS is no match for the men­tal maps of lo­cals. Lo­cated just over 130 kilo­me­tres from bustling Mi­ami, these pro­tected wet­lands are open to ex­plo­ration by water and land. Make charm­ing Everglades City your base, or swap your beach­side stay with the swamp for a day.

The park is home to 1,000 species of seed-bear­ing plants and 120 species of trees. De­spite hu­man and nat­u­ral threats, the ir­re­press­ible flora con­tin­ues to take over the wet­lands; a year af­ter hur­ri­cane Irma tore through the area, Everglades res­i­dents are prov­ing just as re­silient.

The cre­ation of Everglades Na­tional Park trans­formed the area’s econ­omy from fish­ing and hunt­ing to tourism - at least 1 mil­lion peo­ple visit ev­ery year.

PHO­TOS BY / DE RYAN WALKER – MA­GENTA FLASH FOR­WARD PHO­TOG­RA­PHY WIN­NER / PHO­TOGRAPHE PRIMÉ AU FLASH FOR­WARD DE MA­GENTA MAGENTAFOUNDATION.ORG

CLOCK­WISE FROM TOP LEFT The park’s Shark Val­ley ob­ser­va­tion tower is out of sight; brack­ish water runs through the 607,000 hectares of pro­tected land; Ranger Kim­berly Op­pen. The Na­tional Park Ser­vice has presided over the Everglades since 1947.

RIGHT Along the Tami­ami Trail, a shack cleared of trees and fast-grow­ing brush re­calls a time when out­laws and boot­leg­gers nav­i­gated the snaking wa­ter­ways where her­mits lived along­side al­li­ga­tors. ÀDROITE Sur la Tami­ami Trail, une ca­bane dans une clair­ière déboisée et débroussée rap­pelle l’époque où hors-laloi et con­tre­bandiers suiv­aient les sin­ueux cours d’eau où des er­mites vi­vaient parmi les al­li­ga­tors.

ABOVE An em­ployee fixes a truck out­side the Rod & Gun Club, a his­toric Everglades City ho­tel and restau­rant that re­opened af­ter be­ing se­verely dam­aged dur­ing the 2017 hur­ri­cane. CI-DESSUS Un em­ployé ré­pare une camion­nette de­vant le Rod & Gun Club, un hô­tel-restau­rant his­torique d’Everglades City qui a rou­vert après avoir souf­fert lors de l’oura­gan de 2017.

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