Valen­tine’s Day the per­fect time to re­visit some clas­sic films

When it comes to Valen­tine’s Day movies, you sim­ply can’t beat these clas­sics

Calgary Herald - - FRONT PAGE - CHRIS ARNOLD

Af­ter the can­dlelit din­ner is over and the choco­lates are un­wrapped, it’s time to throw on a clas­sic movie for an ex­tra Valen­tine’s Day treat.

For decades, love­struck sto­ries have stayed in the minds of view­ers long af­ter the end cred­its roll. From the first movie to win the five big Os­cars (the “big sweep”) to some more re­cent re­makes of leg­endary love sto­ries, we high­light some to warm your heart.

IT HAP­PENED ONE NIGHT (1934)

Clark Gable and Claudette Col­bert star and Frank Capra di­rected this screw­ball rom-com. Re­porter Peter Warne (Gable) meets rich girl El­lie An­drews (Col­bert) as she’s run­ning away from her fi­ancé. They travel to­gether, de­vel­op­ing feelings but main­tain­ing deco­rum along the way. Sales of un­der­shirts, a pop­u­lar men’s un­der­gar­ment at the time, plum­meted af­ter Gable re­moved his dress shirt to re­veal a bare chest. This flick swept the sev­enth Academy Awards with Os­cars for best pic­ture, di­rec­tor, ac­tor, actress and adapted screen­play.

HIS GIRL FRI­DAY (1940)

Non-stop whip-smart di­a­logue fills this story of news­man Wal­ter Burns (Cary Grant) and his ex-wife/re­porter Hildy John­son (Ros­alind Rus­sell). When Burns learns of John­son’s plans to re­marry, he sets in mo­tion a scheme to thwart the wed­ding by tempt­ing her with the story of an es­caped death row in­mate.

CASABLANCA (1942)

A past love af­fair be­tween Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bog­art) and Ilsa Lund (In­grid Bergman) smoul­ders in the midst of the Sec­ond World War. As Lund’s new hus­band, Czech re­sis­tance leader Vic­tor Las­zlo (Paul Hen­reid), asks Blaine for the pa­pers he and Lund need to flee the Nazis for the U.S., Blaine has his own ideas. This movie has the clas­sic line, “Here’s look­ing at you, kid.”

RO­MAN HOLIDAY (1953)

Au­drey Hep­burn gets her first star­ring role as Princess Ann, who ditches her royal du­ties for an incog­nito out­ing in Rome. Re­porter Joe Bradley (Gre­gory Peck) stum­bles upon her and soon re­al­izes he’s sit­ting on Europe’s big­gest story. Hep­burn’s ef­forts won her the Os­car for best actress.

THE APART­MENT (1960)

C.C. Bax­ter (Jack Lem­mon) climbs the cor­po­rate lad­der by let­ting his bosses use his apart­ment for il­licit trysts. The ca­reer boost wracks his con­science and com­pli­cates his plans to woo el­e­va­tor op­er­a­tor Fran Kube­lik (Shirley Maclaine), who’s caught up in the sex­ca­pades. The doc­tor next door saves the day.

BE MY VALEN­TINE, CHAR­LIE BROWN (1975)

Li­nus has a crush on his teacher, Miss Oth­mar, and buys her a gi­ant heart-shaped box of choco­lates. Sally thinks the gift is for her and makes him a card in re­turn. Lucy goes to a pup­pet show hosted by Char­lie Brown. Snoopy runs the show’s con­ces­sion stand and joins in the pro­duc­tion. Pretty much ev­ery char­ac­ter gets an in­di­vid­ual Valen­tine’s Day story in this en­dear­ing and time­less 30-minute short.

WHEN HARRY MET SALLY ... (1989)

Harry Burns (Billy Crys­tal) and Sally Al­bright (Meg Ryan) share a ride to New York City af­ter grad­u­at­ing from the Univer­sity of Chicago. Harry doesn’t think men and women can be friends be­cause “the sex part al­ways gets in the way.” There is a loud fake or­gasm in a deli — but can they stay apart for­ever?

SAY ANY­THING ... (1989)

Man-with­out-a-plan Lloyd Dobler (John Cu­sack) falls for per­fect stu­dent Diane Court (Ione Skye) dur­ing their grad­u­a­tion cer­e­mony. Over the sum­mer, the two go to par­ties and have din­ner with the par­ents and teach each other valu­able life skills like how to drive stick. If Cu­sack ap­peared out­side of your win­dow hold­ing a boom box, could you say no?

FOUR WED­DINGS AND A FU­NERAL (1994)

Charles (Hugh Grant) keeps bump­ing into Car­rie (Andie Macdow­ell) at wed­dings and falls for her. But their fleeting ro­mance runs askew amid the swirl of cer­e­monies for their cir­cle of friends. And they must con­tend with their own nup­tials ... but to other people. The movie, nom­i­nated for best pic­ture and best orig­i­nal screen­play, pro­pelled Grant to in­ter­na­tional fame.

ROMEO + JULIET (1996)

Di­rec­tor Baz Luhrmann’s mod­ern­ized re­boot of one of most fa­mous love sto­ries ever told fea­tures all the Shake­spearean di­a­logue you can han­dle, but with more shoot­ing. Young Leonardo Dicaprio and Claire Danes star as the ti­tle char­ac­ters in this tale of love, gangs, fam­ily and sui­cide.

WARNER BROS.

A kiss is still a kiss: Love is found and lost in the Academy Award-win­ning 1942 wartime clas­sic Casablanca, star­ring Humphrey Bog­art, left, and In­grid Bergman.

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