Canada's History

Yukon’s booze ban

- Whitehorse

I re­ceived my reg­u­lar is­sue of Canada’s His­tory to­day. Of in­ter­est to me was the ar­ti­cle on pro­hi­bi­tion (“Mak­ing Canada Dry,” June-July 2020). I looked at the ta­ble on page 26, where it shows that Yukon was sub­ject to pro­hi­bi­tion from 1918 to 1921. This does not match my knowl­edge of the topic. The is­sue of pro­hi­bi­tion was raised force­fully by church groups and women in Yukon in 1916, which forced the ter­ri­to­rial govern­ment to hold a plebiscite on the topic in Au­gust of 1916. The “wets” won by three votes. The fed­eral govern­ment in­voked a ban on al­co­hol in April of 1918, which lasted un­til the end of 1919. Af­ter that, the pro­hi­bi­tion­ists be­gan to cam­paign again, and in May of 1920 the “drys” won the day by forty votes. Pro­hi­bi­tion in Yukon lasted only un­til July of the fol­low­ing year.

Michael Gates White­horse

 ??  ?? A Sun­day school group from the Hill­hurst Pres­by­te­rian Church in Calgary protests against al­co­hol circa 1912–16. Church and women’s groups led the cam­paign for tem­per­ance and pro­hi­bi­tion.
A Sun­day school group from the Hill­hurst Pres­by­te­rian Church in Calgary protests against al­co­hol circa 1912–16. Church and women’s groups led the cam­paign for tem­per­ance and pro­hi­bi­tion.

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