Canada's Local Gardener

Companion planting guide

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In the vegetable garden, some plants are like good neighbours, trading recipes and tools, and others just don’t work together. This is the idea behind companion planting, a now-traditiona­l way of deciding which veggies go together and which should be kept apart.

Although there are a few relationsh­ips where one vegetable actually benefits the growth of another, such as with legumes (beans and peas) fixing nitrogen in the soil for carrots and corn, most companion planting is based on the following: attracting beneficial insects to the garden or discouragi­ng harmful insects.

In addition, there are several flowers that attract harmful insects that would otherwise go to your vegetables. Some of these flowers are calendula, French marigold, nasturtium, chrysanthe­mum, sweet alyssum and zinnia.

When you’re planning your plots for spring, here’s a handy chart to have nearby. Do your best to keep bad neighbours apart and good neighbours closer together.

Carrot.

 ??  ?? Cucumber.
Cucumber.
 ??  ?? Corn.
Corn.
 ??  ?? Asparagus.
Asparagus.
 ??  ?? Basil.
Basil.
 ??  ?? Beans.
Beans.
 ??  ?? Dill.
Dill.
 ??  ?? Eggplant.
Eggplant.
 ??  ?? Broccoli.
Broccoli.
 ??  ?? Cauliflowe­r.
Cauliflowe­r.

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