Canadian Cycling Magazine - - Gear -

Levi’s

Com­muter Trucker Jacket

$148

With Levi’s Com­muter Trucker jacket, the com­pany up­dates its clas­sic jean jacket for ur­ban cy­cling. Cy­cling-spe­cific touches in­clude a stretchy blended-cot­ton ma­te­rial for easy move­ment and spe­cial fab­ric treat­ments that re­sist wa­ter, dirt and odours. Levi also adds low-pro­file pock­ets on the back for stor­age, while Scotch­lite tape in­creases rider safety when com­mut­ing home in the evening. This is a nice, stylish ad­di­tion to any cy­clist’s wardrobe and is es­pe­cially use­ful in sit­u­a­tions when Ly­cra seems out of place. (

levi.com)

Fred Perry/ Bradley Wig­gins

Golden Age Cy­cling Shirt

$145

While it might be dif­fi­cult to match Bradley Wig­gins’s prow­ess on the bike, it’s a bit eas­ier to im­i­tate his mod­ish fash­ion sense. The Bradley Wig­gins col­lec­tion by Fred Perry fea­tures stylish short- and long-sleeve shirts, jack­ets, shorts and even shoes and bags. The Golden Age cy­cling shirt evokes the look of jer­seys from the ’50s and ’60s. It breaks from Fred Perry’s tra­di­tional set of but­tons up to the col­lar with a zip­per. An­other zip­per at the lower back closes up a dis­creet pocket. (

fred­perry.com)

Out­lier

New OGS

US$240

Out­lier has been qui­etly build­ing some of the most stylish ur­ban cy­cling cloth­ing on the mar­ket. The new ogs pants ex­em­plify the com­pany’s abil­ity to merge fash­ion and func­tion. The ogs pants are con­structed from pre­mium stretch wo­ven Schoeller Dryskin fab­ric from Switzer­land that de­liv­ers ex­cep­tional dura­bil­ity, dries quickly and, thanks to the NanoSphere sur­face treat­ment, is highly re­sis­tant to wa­ter, dirt and stains. But all this tex­tile magic is mean­ing­less if the gar­ment doesn’t fit prop­erly. Out­lier knows this and has ad­justed the pat­tern so that the pants elim­i­nate the un­flat­ter­ing plumber-butt com­monly seen in other trousers, while still main­tain­ing a trim ath­letic fit. Made in New York, the ogs blends ex­cep­tional fab­rics, cy­clingspe­cific func­tion and mod­ern ur­ban styling suc­cess­fully. Highly rec­om­mended. (

out­lier.cc)

Out­lier

Women’s Daily Rid­ing Pant

US$225

Made in New York with pre­mium stretch wo­ven Schoeller Dryskin fab­ric, the Women’s Daily Rid­ing Pant is a great op­tion for com­mut­ing or wan­der­ing around town. The fab­ric’s spe­cial treat­ment en­sures that wa­ter, wine and cof­fee sim­ply roll off. The pants also fea­ture a slim and flat­ter­ing fit that cre­ates an at­trac­tive ur­ban look. Out­lier has added sub­tle de­tail­ing for an ex­tra hint of so­phis­ti­ca­tion. The im­pec­ca­ble con­struc­tion en­sures the Women’s Daily Rid­ing Pant won’t fall apart af­ter one sea­son. (

out­lier.cc)

Brooks

Is­ling­ton Ruck­sack

$425

The beau­ti­ful Ital­ian-made Is­ling­ton ruck­sack of­fers ur­ban riders un­der­stated old-world es­thet­ics with a sur­pris­ingly so­phis­ti­cated and ef­fec­tive har­ness sys­tem. Brooks builds the bag with a com­bi­na­tion of waxed cot­ton and leather that give a won­der­ful old-ruck­sack look while still pro­vid­ing dura­bil­ity and wa­ter re­sis­tance. A roomy zip­pered pocket pro­vides stor­age for daily essen­tials; the sim­ple flap clo­sure keeps out the weather ef­fec­tively. Per­haps the bag’s most in­ter­est­ing fea­ture, how­ever, is the highly con­fig­urable shoul­der har­ness that’s rem­i­nis­cent of what would be worn by a Sec­ond World War Bri­tish para­trooper. The har­ness can be set up quickly to in­clude a load-sta­bi­liz­ing waist belt or even a more se­cure cross- chest con­fig­u­ra­tion. With its at­trac­tive and rugged metal buck­les, this bag is un­doubt­edly one of the most stylish and func­tional ur­ban com­mut­ing packs avail­able. (

brook­sen­g­land.com)

Shi­mano

PD-T400 Click’r Ped­als

$75

Com­muters look­ing for a ver­sa­tile pedal that can be used with or with­out spe­cial shoes, or any­one ner­vous about us­ing cli­p­less ped­als, should check out Shi­mano’s Click’r Ped­als. Shi­mano sur­rounds the cli­p­less- pedal mech­a­nism with a large plat­form al­low­ing riders to pedal com­fort­ably re­gard­less of what footwear they’re us­ing. This setup is a huge ben­e­fit for com­muters who may oc­ca­sion­ally want to wear slightly dressier, non- cy­cling shoes to work. New riders that want to ex­pe­ri­ence the ben­e­fits of cli­p­less ped­als will also ap­pre­ci­ate these plat­forms as they of­fer ex­cel­lent re­ten­tion and power trans­fer. But thanks to their lower spring ten­sion, they’re sig­nif­i­cantly eas­ier to exit, es­pe­cially dur­ing a pan­icked stop. (

bike.shi­mano.com)

Abus

Bordo 6000 Fold­ing Lock

$135 (90 cm), $125 (75 cm)

Com­muters who don’t en­joy car­ry­ing a bulky U-lock, but re­quire more se­cu­rity than a ca­ble lock should look at the Bordo 6000. Con­sist­ing of a se­ries of linked, flat metal plates, the lock re­sem­bles an old-school fold­ing car­pen­ter’s ruler. As such, it folds into a rel­a­tively small and easy-to- carry pack­age dur­ing trans­port. When opened, the Bordo 6000 has plenty of reach to lock up a bike. It’s a nice al­ter­na­tive to U-locks in medium- to low-risk bike-theft ar­eas. (

abus.com)

Thule

Pack 'n' Pedal Large Ad­ven­ture Tour­ing Pan­nier

$164

The Thule Pack n' Pedal Large Ad­ven­ture Tour­ing pan­nier pro­vides some truly ' in­no­va­tive fea­tures mak­ing it a top choice for any se­ri­ous com­muter. While all riders will ap­pre­ci­ate how this pan­nier is com­pat­i­ble with al­most any rack, the most in­ter­est­ing fea­ture is the hard­ware-at­tach­ment sys­tem that sim­ply can be flipped in­ward when not in use. This seem­ingly sim­ple fea­ture cre­ates a clean snag-proof pro­file mak­ing for an easy-to- carry bag. For safety, the bag has re­flec­tive high­lights as well as bike light pock­ets that al­low riders to keep “blinky lights” with them at all times. Thule uses a proven roll-top clo­sure for weather pro­tec­tion as well as a pair of cus­tom-made com­pres­sion buck­les and straps to sta­bi­lize the load. This is a well-made prod­uct that will not dis­ap­point. (

thule.com)

Spo­ken

Sad­dle Roll

$40

The Spo­ken sad­dle roll will snug some es­sen­tial tools and a tube be­neath you as you ride. The roll is made by Karl Roth, of Ot­tawa. He got started mak­ing bik­ere­lated bags a few years ago with the Sprout, a roll-top back­pack. With the sad­dle roll, he was in­spired by the idea of an old-time hand­ker­chief wrapped around a seat­post. But his cre­ation is much more se­cure with the hook-and­loop strap. “It’s very mod­u­lar,” Roth says. “It rolls up and its con­tents don’t have to be fit into a zip­pered pocket. It can fit a 15-mm box wrench if you have a solid axle.” He used waxed can­vas be­cause he likes the time­less ma­te­rial. It will also pro­tect your tools from the ef­fects of spray. But if you are get­ting too much spray, maybe you should check out some of the fend­ers in this sec­tion. (

spo­ken­bags.com)

Rapha

Brief­case

$285

The el­e­gant Rapha Brief­case of­fers cy­clists a stylish way to trans­port daily work essen­tials (think pa­per­work, lap­top). The bag fea­tures leather han­dles and trim, mul­ti­ple pock­ets, a padded lap­top sleeve and a de­tach­able shoul­der strap. While the bag can be used in courier bag-mode when rid­ing to work, its boxy pro­por­tions and the lack of a sta­bi­liz­ing waist strap make it sus­cep­ti­ble to un­wanted shift­ing dur­ing longer com­mutes. Best suited for shorter trips where main­tain­ing cy­cling style is crit­i­cal. (

rapha.cc)

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