SHRED GIRL

Canadian Cycling Magazine - - INSPIRING GIRLS TO RIDE -

If you are a par­ent read­ing this, you might be ready to drag your daugh­ter out for a ride im­me­di­ately. While that en­thu­si­asm is great, be­ware of a few com­mon pit­falls. Make sure to nur­ture a love of rid­ing the right way.

OF­FER VA­RI­ETY

Your daugh­ter just might not love what you love. If you’re a roadie, your daugh­ter may pre­fer the pump track, and vice versa. Make sure she has the chance to try out dif­fer­ent types of rid­ing.

, DON T JUST MAKE IT DAUGH­TER AND ME TIME

While par­ent-daugh­ter time is a huge part of the equa­tion, your daugh­ter shouldn’t just be rid­ing with you. Try to get her friends out on bikes. Try to find a lo­cal pro­gram for young rid­ers, or even just show up to bike parks that will have other kids her age hang­ing out. While that par­ent-child time is price­less, some­day she’ll be faster than you and will need some peers to ride with.

SNEAK IT IN

If your daugh­ter/niece/lit­tle sis­ter isn’t in­ter­ested, don’t push cy­cling on her. But sub­tle hints – such as leav­ing the Shred-girls.com site open in your browser (or buy­ing the book when it’s out in Sum­mer 2019!), or leav­ing your copy of Cana­dian cy­cling mag­a­zine open to an ar­ti­cle about Emily Batty on the kitchen ta­ble – may help fos­ter an in­ter­est in cy­cling.

FO­CUS ON SMALL STEPS

If you’re try­ing to coach a young rider, re­mem­ber to fo­cus on small pro­gres­sions. Keep in mind that 20" wheels won’t be able to do the same things your 29" wheels can. “The skills of moun­tain bik­ing aren’t go­ing to mag­i­cally ap­pear your first day. It takes years of small pro­gres­sions,” Meeuwisse says.

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