Read­ing res­o­lu­tions and a roundup of love sto­ries that stand the test of time (and tis­sues)

New year, new books to read! This month, we’re turn­ing our at­ten­tion to the lat­est of­fer­ings that will help keep our res­o­lu­tions on the right path.

Canadian Living - - Contents -

The Age of Light FIC­TION (LIT­TLE, BROWN AND CO.) BY WHIT­NEY SCHARER, $23.

This year, my goal is to de­vote more at­ten­tion to de­but au­thors. To that end, Whit­ney Scharer’s se­duc­tive and sear­ing semi­fic­tional tale of the life of Lee Miller, 1920s model–turned­pho­tog­ra­pher-turned–sec­ond World War cor­re­spon­dent for Vogue and muse/lover of artist Man Ray, is first on my list, and it’s an amaz­ing read. In Scharer’s skil­ful hands, the blend of what’s fact and fic­tion is seam­less

( and re­veals the brave, un­con­ven­tional and dar­ing Miller as—de­spite all her il­lus­tri­ous hy­phen­ates—a heart­break­ingly hu­man woman whose ex­traor­di­nary life is worth com­mem­o­rat­ing. Lee Miller—and Whit­ney Scharer— are my new idols. —SM

Kinda Ve­gan COOK­BOOK (ADAMS ME­DIA) BY ADAMS ME­DIA, $26.

To be hon­est, re­stric­tive di­ets aren’t my thing. But with in­creased aware­ness of how food pro­duc­tion im­pacts cli­mate change (which is an in-our-life­time threat), I’m seek­ing out new ways to add veg­etable-based meals to my reper­toire that are tasty and easy to pull to­gether. It’s a res­o­lu­tion I aim to keep this year, so I’ll be re­ly­ing on a few ve­gan and veg­e­tar­ian cook­books to help me through. I can’t wait to make the Easy Black Bean Burg­ers and the Egg­plant Put­tanesca from this pick, out in Jan­uary. —AD

Good and Mad NON­FIC­TION (SI­MON & SCHUS­TER) BY RE­BECCA TRAISTER, $36.

Let’s face it: As women, we live in a world that doesn’t take our anger se­ri­ously and has taught us to sup­press our rage. I know that I, for one, can bot­tle things up. So when I picked up the lat­est from Re­becca Traister—au­thor of All the Sin­gle Ladies, writer for New York mag­a­zine and con­tribut­ing edi­tor at Elle— I was in­spired by her sharp in­sights in this ex­plo­ration of the power of women’s anger and its abil­ity to ef­fect change and al­ter the course of his­tory. Good and Mad will fire you up, leav­ing you ed­u­cated and re­solved to put your rage to good use in 2019. I’ll be rec­om­mend­ing it to ev­ery­one I know. —AE

As the an­nual visit of Cupid and his amour-wield­ing ar­row ap­proaches, we at Cana­dian Liv­ing are con­tem­plat­ing the idea of lit­er­ary love. The CL Book Club mem­bers took a poll of our col­leagues’ beloved books about this en­chanted state of be­ing, and we’re happy ever af­ter about the re­sults. Did your favourite make our list? Email us at cl.read­[email protected] and let us know!

The Martha Man­ual NON­FIC­TION (HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HAR­COURT) BY MARTHA STE­WART, $50.

My New Year’s res­o­lu­tion takes the cake (lit­er­ally): Be more like Martha Ste­wart. I want to be ti­dier, bet­ter or­ga­nized, able to fix any­thing, re­move any stain, grow a great gar­den, mend my clothes, tackle my home hand­i­work, host a killer party and cook the per­fect feast—with, of course, a per­fectly frosted cake to fin­ish it all off. Luck­ily, I’ve laid my hands on an ex­pert how-to for ev­ery­thing listed above— The Martha Man­ual: How to Do (Al­most) Any­thing. A tell-all tome for bud­ding homemak­ers and as­pir­ing do-it-your­selfers, this will be my key to be­ing the queen of do­ing it all. —SC

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