Im­proves over­all health

Canadian Running - - GOLDEN SHOE AWARDS -

6

There’s a rea­son why

t he Cana­dian So­ci­ety for Ex­er­cise Phys­i­ol­ogy rec­om­mends adults get 150 min­utes of moder­ate to vig­or­ous move­ment per week. Phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity re­duces our risk of heart dis­ease, stroke, breast and colon can­cer, and type II di­a­betes. “There’s so much re­search that sug­gests that ex­er­cise is medicine,” says Je­witt. “Even low-in­ten­sity-type run­ning can make a re­ally big dif­fer­ence to the body’s cel­lu­lar, molec­u­lar level, of how it ac­tu­ally be­haves, ba­si­cally by im­prov­ing our bod­ies’ abil­ity to fight off dis­ease and de­crease inf lam­ma­tion.” A 2014 study pub­lished in the Jour­nal of the Amer­i­can Col­lege of Car­di­ol­ogy found that run­ning – even at slow speeds – sig­nif­i­cantly re­duces a per­son’s risk of dy­ing from car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease. Weight-bear­ing phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity, like run­ning, is good for your bones too, by help­ing treat and pre­vent os­teo­poro­sis. You might also find that when you’re run­ning reg­u­larly, you sleep bet­ter and want to eat more nu­tri­tious foods, too. That’s some­thing Cun­ning­ham has no­ticed. “If you learn to en­joy [run­ning] or find some kind of ac­tiv­ity you en­joy, the rest of your life kind of gets health­ier by de­fault,” she says. Rhi­an­non Rus­sell is a free­lance jour­nal­ist who lives in White­horse, and a reg­u­lar con­trib­u­tor to Cana­dian Run­ning mag­a­zine. She’s writ­ten for The Wal­rus, Out­side and Cana­dian Liv­ing

EVEN LOW-INTENSITYTYPE RUN­NING CAN MAKE A RE­ALLY BIG DIF­FER­ENCE TO THE BODY’ S CEL­LU­LAR, MOLEC­U­LAR LEVEL, BY IM­PROV­ING OUR BOD­IES’ ABIL­ITY TO FIGHT OFF DIS­EASE AND DE­CREASE IN­FLAM­MA­TION.

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