Mom filmed while breast­feed­ing her baby

Woman con­cerned hos­pi­tal se­cu­rity didn’t ad­dress sit­u­a­tion, dis­rup­tion it caused

Cape Breton Post - - FRONT PAGE - BY NIKKI SUL­LI­VAN

When Ni­cole Fraser’s 10-month-old daugh­ter got fussy while in the wait­ing room of the or­tho­pe­dic clinic at the Cape Breton Re­gional Hos­pi­tal Fri­day morn­ing, she breast­fed her.

Wear­ing a large sweater and tank top, Fraser said she was able to dis­creetly feed her daugh­ter with­out “whip­ping it out” and only the sides of her breast might have been show­ing.

It was the “nat­u­ral” thing for Fraser, 24, to do. She has breast­fed her daugh­ter from birth and in pub­lic many times be­fore.

What wasn’t nat­u­ral for Fraser was to be recorded breast­feed­ing by a man she didn’t know, who was sit­ting across from her.

Fraser said a woman sit­ting be­side the man with two young boys had looked at what the man was do­ing on his phone and then started yelling at him for record­ing her.

“He said, ‘I wouldn’t do that,’ with a smug grin” then she (the woman) said to my mom, ‘He is record­ing your daugh­ter breast­feed­ing.’ That’s when a man on the other side of the man looked over and said, ‘Oh my God, you are record­ing her breast­feed­ing,’” Fraser told the Cape Breton Post.

“It broke my heart in­stantly, I started cry­ing and hav­ing a panic at­tack. I felt vi­o­lated and ob­jec­ti­fied for do­ing some­thing that’s so nat­u­ral to do.”

Fraser said more peo­ple started to yell at the man, ob­vi­ously an­gry, and she went to se­cu­rity to alert them of the es­ca­lat­ing sit­u­a­tion.

“He said, ‘Well we can’t take his phone and we can’t move him so there’s not a whole lot to we can do. If you are un­com­fort­able, you can go to the nurs­ing room,’” she said.

“I said, ‘OK, I un­der­stand you can’t take his phone but there’s four or five peo­ple down there scream­ing at this man … I re­ally think you should send some­body down there, it’s get­ting quite loud.’”

She re­turned to the wait­ing room but se­cu­rity didn’t come with her and the sit­u­a­tion con­tin­ued to get “very heated,” ac­cord­ing to Fraser. That’s when she called her hus­band and he told her to go back to se­cu­rity and de­mand po­lice be called.

“I don’t want it to seem like I am de­fend­ing this man, I am not. I am grate­ful for all the peo­ple who stood up for me and my daugh­ter, but if the wrong per­son had of been in there some­one could have got­ten hurt,” Fraser said, ad­mit­ting she feared things could have turned vi­o­lent.

Fraser said when she went to se­cu­rity the sec­ond time

“We re­gret that the mom was made to feel un­com­fort­able while do­ing some­thing that is nat­u­ral, healthy and within her rights. This is a healthy prac­tice that we al­ways sup­port and we apol­o­gize for her ex­pe­ri­ence. Record­ing or tak­ing pho­tos of other peo­ple, pa­tients, or their fam­ily mem­bers is not per­mit­ted.” Greg Boone, spokesper­son for the Nova Sco­tia Health Au­thor­ity Eastern Zone

to ask if they were go­ing to come deal with the sit­u­a­tion, she was told they were deal­ing with a code white in the emer­gency room, where there is a po­ten­tially vi­o­lent per­son, and couldn’t go to the or­tho­pe­dic clinic wait­ing room at that time.

“He said, ‘So there’s no one here who could help you.’ Mind you, when I was stand­ing there, there was three se­cu­rity of­fi­cers lit­er­ally stand­ing be­hind the glass,” she said.

Fraser asked the se­cu­rity guard to call po­lice and she said he told her the po­lice couldn’t do any­thing and no one would be able to help her.

“It’s a pretty messed up sit­u­a­tion … to be in a sit­u­a­tion like that where you are not taken se­ri­ously and made to feel like you are be­ing a nui­sance when there was a dis­tur­bance,” she said. “You would at least ex­pect some­one to show up.”

Greg Boone, spokesper­son for the Nova Sco­tia Health Au­thor­ity Eastern Zone, said there are times when sit­u­a­tions at the hos­pi­tal, like a code white or mul­ti­ple codes at one time, re­sult in no trained staff avail­able to re­spond to other sit­u­a­tions. How­ever, they are look­ing into what hap­pened Fri­day af­ter the man­ager of hos­pi­tal se­cu­rity and a pa­tient rep­re­sen­ta­tive met with Fraser and her hus­band, James Fraser, on Mon­day.

“NSHA pro­motes and sup­ports breast­feed­ing in pub­lic spa­ces. As part of that we pro­vide a breast­feed­ing friendly en­vi­ron­ment in our fa­cil­i­ties. Moth­ers are wel­come to breast­feed in our pub­lic spa­ces,” he said via email.

“We re­gret that the mom was made to feel un­com­fort­able while do­ing some­thing that is nat­u­ral, healthy and within her rights. This is a healthy prac­tice that we al­ways sup­port and we apol­o­gize for her ex­pe­ri­ence. Record­ing or tak­ing pho­tos of other peo­ple, pa­tients, or their fam­ily mem­bers is not per­mit­ted.”

Boone said the NSHA and the Re­gional Hos­pi­tal ex­pect that pa­tients, fam­ily mem­bers and vis­i­tors will not be recorded with­out per­mis­sion at any time in the hos­pi­tal and ask peo­ple to not use mo­bile phones or de­vices while in treat­ment ar­eas.

Fraser and her hus­band said they were pleased with the meet­ing they had at the hos­pi­tal and said they were given a ver­bal apol­ogy and told the mat­ter was be­ing in­ves­ti­gated.

NIKKI SUL­LI­VAN/CAPE BRETON POST

Ni­cole Fraser and her hus­band, James Fraser, stand be­side a sign, lo­cated close to the main en­trance, that in­di­cates the Cape Breton Re­gional Hos­pi­tal is a breast­feed­ing friendly en­vi­ron­ment. On Fri­day, Ni­cole was video­taped by a stranger while...

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.