PRO­DUC­TIVE ARTIST BUCKS PRO­DUC­TIV­ITY

Dc3 in­stal­la­tion ex­plores in­ter­play of work and rest

Edmonton Journal - - YOU - FISH GRI­WKOWSKY fgri­wkowsky@post­media.com Twit­ter: @fisheye­foto

As usual, dc3 Art Projects is a hive of ac­tiv­ity — even though one of its key pieces of art by Cindy Baker is about em­brac­ing the op­po­site: in­ac­tiv­ity.

In her show Crash Pad, which wraps up af­ter Satur­day at the 10567 111 St. gallery, Baker ad­dresses a num­ber of top­ics, in­clud­ing be­ing un­com­fort­able in our fail­ing, so-called “im­per­fect” bod­ies.

Through the show’s run, the artist has been do­ing du­ra­tional per­for­mances, in­ten­tion­ally try­ing to rest and sleep in a gi­ant shift­ing bed de­signed to look like a pill blis­ter pack. The bed shifts around, so it’s not easy — and var­i­ous artists in­clud­ing Brian Webb, Al­li­son Tu­nis and Richard Boulet have “dis­rupted” her with move­ment and sound.

Up­com­ing, the fi­nal two sleep­over guests are Natalie Love­less — moved from their sched­uled spot Thurs­day to 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fri­day — and a fi­nale with Zachari Lo­gan, from noon to 5 p.m. Satur­day. Lo­gan’s in­cred­i­ble draw­ings are on the walls in his own show, Naked Bod­ies: Se­lected Bod­ies 2008-2018, along­side Baker’s de­light­fully ca­sual Crash Pad Draw­ings se­ries, which she’s been adding to through the show.

So much for tak­ing a break — but Baker’s been mak­ing in­spir­ing, ex­ploratory work for a long time. You can’t just stop.

“I was do­ing a lot of knit and cro­chet work when I first fin­ished my BFA,” Baker ex­plains in a con­ver­sa­tion with Jessa Gille­spie at dc3, “stuff that looked ex­actly like the paint­ings that I was do­ing, but also looked like some­thing that your grand­mother would make, or that you would find at a craft sale or some­thing like that. And that’s also when I started per­form­ing; I just thought, ‘If I don’t have to make art that looks like art, I could do any­thing.’”

Baker brings that back to this show: “One of the things that makes it a lit­tle more con­tem­po­rary is be­ing very specif­i­cally re­spon­sive to the cur­rent neo-lib­eral com­pul­sion for pro­duc­tiv­ity, as I’m re­sist­ing pro­duc­tiv­ity.”

She notes she’s in­ten­tion­ally ap­pear­ing to refuse to work in her per­for­mances, “But, at the same time, it’s ac­tu­ally re­ally hard work, and any­one who wit­nesses the per­for­mance sees that I’m ac­tu­ally work­ing very hard and that it’s still hard on my body and that it takes a lot out of me.”

Don’t miss this.

Or this …

Cana­dian Art magazine is host­ing some­thing it’s call­ing Gallery Day Satur­day with a se­ries of talks, a launch of its lat­est is­sue, and the un­veil­ing of a mu­ral on the back­side of dc3 — all free of charge.

It starts at 3 p.m. at Betty An­drews Recital Hall at MacEwan Univer­sity — 11110 104 Ave. — with a screen­ing of Richelle Bear Hat’s In Her Care, a con­ver­sa­tion to fol­low. Next — nearby at MacEwan’s Al­lard Hall at 4 p.m. — the won­der­ful Brenda Draney will walk us through her per­ma­nent, built-in art Trapline, one of the city ’s most in­ter­est­ing sculp­tural works.

Fi­nally, at 6 p.m., back at dc3, the new is­sue will launch amid Baker and Lo­gan’s show, while a mu­ral by Lau­ren Crazy­bull and a team of lo­cal youth will be of­fi­cially un­veiled — fol­lowed by a con­ver­sa­tion with Cana­dian Art’s In­dige­nous ed­i­torat-large, Lind­say Nixon.

dc3, by the way, would also like to send some love to Gather Co. — Kelly and Devin Pope — who of­fered up their wall for yet an­other in­no­va­tive mu­ral in this city which has seen un­prece­dented waves of ex­cit­ing new wall art in the last three years.

Pow­er­ful Inuit spirit-sum­moner Tanya Taqaq, Ja­maican dub pi­o­neer Lee (Scratch) Perry, artrock­ers SUUNS and indie rock’s De­stroyer lead the charge in a wicked-look­ing Up and Down­town Mu­sic Fes­ti­val lineup, run­ning Oct. 5-7 through 10 down­town venues.

The first-re­leased 2018 batch of over 100 UP+DT per­form­ers in­cludes Jonathan Rich­man, Brant Bjork, An­tibalas, Earth­less, Mauno, Thao, Zeal & Ardor, Ra­dio Moscow, Michale Graves of the Mis­fits, Astronoid, Lan­guage Arts, Too At­tached, Com­mon Holly, the May­bellines 20 year re­union show, Mad Alchemy, Poor Name­less Boy, the Vel­veteins and lo­cal beaut Jody Shenkarek.

The fes­ti­val will also host two pod­cast tap­ings, Van­cou­ver’s Stop Pod­cast­ing Your­self and the Star Trek-lov­ing The Great­est Gen­er­a­tion, which tack­les Jean Luc Pi­card, Ben­jamin Sisko and their crews’ ad­ven­tures, episode by episode.

More an­nounce­ments are on their way, and the fest’s sched­ule will be up in late Au­gust.

In its sixth year, this year’s UP+DT venues are 9910, CKUA Ra­dio Per­for­mance Hall, Down­town Ed­mon­ton Com­mu­nity League Of­fice, Freema­son Hall, McDougall United Church, Rocky Moun­tain Ice­house, Tem­ple, Knoxville’s Tav­ern, Cask & Bar­rel and Star­lite Room.

A three-day all-ac­cess pass is an early bird $95 un­til Aug. 31, while quan­ti­ties last); reg­u­lar — $115. Fri­day- and Satur­day-only passes are $52.50 each.

All-ac­cess passes are avail­able through YEGLive.ca and at Black­byrd My­oozik (10442 Whyte Av­enue) as of 10 a.m. Fri­day.

Sin­gle show tick­ets range from $10 — $35, with lim­ited shows on sale start­ing Fri­day, June 15 at 10 a.m. The re­main­ing sin­gle show tick­ets will be re­leased in late Au­gust, in con­junc­tion with the fes­ti­val’s sched­ule.

Oh, and singly, Star­lite/Tem­ple shows are avail­able through Tick­et­fly.com and at Black­byrd. All other sin­gle show tick­ets avail­able through YEGlive.ca.

For full de­tails, head to updt.ca.

Fi­nally, more concert news. Drake has added a sec­ond Rogers Place show Nov. 7 on his Aubrey and the Three Mi­gos Tour — so he’ll be here Nov. 6 + 7. Tick­ets run $59.50 through $199.50.

And Natalie MacMaster and hubby Don­nell Leahy are bring­ing A Celtic Fam­ily Christ­mas to the Jube Dec. 1. Those tick­ets are $29 through $59.50.

Both events are on sale at live­na­tion.ca 10 Fri­day — how ever will you choose be­tween them?

I just thought, ‘If I don’t have to make art that looks like art, I could do any­thing.’

Cindy Baker tries to get some shut-eye as part of her show Crash Pad at dc3 Art Projects.

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