SMALL PLATES, BIG NIGHT

Make the menu the New Year’s Eve event, and keep the food go­ing all through the evening, with small-por­tion cour­ses that guests can take turns prep­ping in the kitchen— ac­com­pa­nied by friends and per­fectly paired wines.

Food & Drink - - TWISTS SIMPLE ADDITIONS - COPY & PAIR­INGS BY JAMES CHATTO RECIPES BY SIGNE LANG­FORD PHO­TOG­RA­PHY BY JAMES TSE

A NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY is al­ways one of the best get-to­geth­ers of all, but it’s guar­an­teed to be a long evening. Af­ter all, ev­ery­one has to stay un­til mid­night has come and gone, and a Cham­pagne toast can rekin­dle con­vivi­al­ity into the wee small hours. A smart host knows to pace things out. Stretch din­ner into a se­ries of well-separated cour­ses with a fair bit of time in be­tween. And no one wants to sit at a din­ner ta­ble for four hours, so use dif­fer­ent parts of your home for each course.

Our menu is de­signed with this plan in mind. Serve our roasted pear salad in the kitchen per­haps, with guests stand­ing in­for­mally around the is­land. Move to the liv­ing room for our broiled oys­ters then, at last, to the din­ner ta­ble for the main cour­ses of lol­lipop lamb chops and bow-tie pasta. For dessert, move back to the liv­ing room.

Party games and pas­times are a cen­turies-old tra­di­tion, es­pe­cially at this time of the year, now ea­gerly re­vived by mil­len­ni­als. We have some fun sug­ges­tions along those lines, as well.

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