Em­mett’s para­chute got line twist caus­ing him to corkscrew through the air be­fore crash­ing blindly into the talus floor.

Gripped - - FEATURE -

rock toss, deemed the exit ac­cept­able and mo­ments later, jumped in uni­son. Em­mett’s para­chute got line twist caus­ing him to corkscrew through the air be­fore crash­ing blindly into the talus f loor. He es­caped with mi­nor in­juries but was shaken up. He is a per fec­tion­ist who is metic­u­lous with pack­ing his chute and as­sess­ing exit points. His tech­ni­cal sav vy is matched by his in­tu­ition and phys­i­cal strength, so hav­ing trou­ble like that was, in his own words, “not ac­cept­able.”

We had ac­com­plished two out of three of our ob­jec­tives and we knew luck had played a part in it. The clear skies that granted us safe pas­sage turned dark and rain fell. We took refuge in a cave un­der a boul­der and bivied un­til the fol­low­ing af­ter­noon when we re­turned to base camp. The take­off from Vam­pire Lake was hor­rif ying. LaFavre was boxed in, forc­ing him to take of f in a tight turn barely of f the deck. I was cer­tain we were go­ing to crash, I turned around to look at the boys be­hind me, hop­ing for en­cour­ag­ing looks that were not there. Martinello was shak­ing his head and Lear y had tears run­ning down his face. I’m cer­tain LaFavre en­joyed it ver y much. It was back to the Na­hanni and an­other full

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.