Fu­ture Lead­ers Awards

Rec­og­niz­ing women un­der the age of 30 who have dis­tin­guished them­selves early in their ca­reers

National Post (Latest Edition) - - WXN TOP 100 -

SHEREEN ANIS CEO KID KODER’Z CITY INC.

BIO: A six-time award-win­ning se­rial en­tre­pre­neur de­ter­mined to em­power more young women to choose a ca­reer in tech­nol­ogy, Shereen Anis founded Kid Koder’z City, a tech-ed sum­mer camp and af­ter­school en­rich­ment pro­gram, as well as tWEam Ini­tia­tives Inc, Netwurxx and Tu­torPass. She’s been a speaker at TEDx UET Pak­istan. Anis was rec­og­nized by Gov­er­nor Gen­eral David John­ston with the Car­ing Cana­dian Award and is a part of the 2016 Queen’s Young Lead­ers pro­gram.

EARLY AND LAST­ING LESSONS: “Re­fus­ing to fit in and main­tain­ing my own unique iden­tity while be­ing the weird one has been my most prized les­son.” WHO I’D TRADE PLACES WITH FOR JUST ONE DAY: “Marissa Mayer, CEO of Ya­hoo. Her per­se­ver­ance, tenac­ity and re­silience in lead­ing an ar­guably fail­ing com­pany is le­gendary. What makes her even more ex­cep­tional is her abil­ity to com­mu­ni­cate per­son­ally, de­spite the tough­est of times. This is how I see strong, pow­er­ful women lead­ing across all in­dus­tries.”

VÉRONIQUE JAC­QUES Com­bat En­gi­neer Of­fi­cer CANA­DIAN ARMED FORCES

BIO: How do you cre­ate a life and build a ca­reer that will give you the op­por­tu­nity to have a pos­i­tive im­pact on the world stage? If you’re Véronique Jac­ques, you be­come a civil en­gi­neer and join the Cana­dian Armed Forces. Jac­ques is part of the Cana­dian con­tin­gent on Op­er­a­tion SO­PRANO as part of the United Na­tions mis­sion in the re­pub­lic of South Su­dan and, in July 2016, she be­came ad­ju­tant of­fi­cer for the com­man­der of base con­struc­tion en­gi­neer­ing in the St-Jean-surRiche­lieu re­gion. This year, she won the Woman of Dis­tinc­tion Award from the Mon­tréal Y Foun­da­tion. EARLY AND LAST­ING LESSONS: “Do not post­pone!”

ON BE­ING DE­SCRIBED AS POW­ER­FUL: “I feel grate­ful to be rec­og­nized.” ON HOW TO RAISE YOUR VOICE: “Be­lieve in your­self and keep go­ing.” WHO I’D TRADE PLACES WITH FOR JUST ONE DAY: “The gov­er­nor gen­eral. I would love to learn more about his work and rep­re­sent Canada.”

AMÉLIE T. GOUIN As­so­ciate BOR­DEN LADNER GER­VAIS LLP

BIO: Amélie T. Gouin was ad­mit­ted to the Bar­reau du Que­bec in 2012. Since join­ing Bor­den Ladner Ger­vais, she has worked in in­ter­na­tional com­mer­cial ar­bi­tra­tion and is in­ter­ested in class ac­tions, real es­tate law, share­hold­ers’ re­courses and fraud cases. She was French ex­ec­u­tive edi­tor of the McGill Law Jour­nal and for many years has been in­volved in the ac­tiv­i­ties of the Young Cham­ber of Com­merce of Mon­treal, where she serves on the board.

EARLY AND LAST­ING LESSONS: “Stay calm and carry on. You al­ways find the time to get where you want to be.”

ON BE­ING DE­SCRIBED AS POW­ER­FUL: “I just do my best to achieve what I want and to be sat­is­fied by who I am and what I do.”

ON HOW TO RAISE YOUR VOICE: “I ‘raise my voice’ by bring­ing con­struc­tive and con­crete so­lu­tions to the ta­ble and by mak­ing sure that my ac­tions talk for them­selves.”

AMANDA KHAN Med­i­cal Stu­dent THE UNI­VER­SITY OF TORONTO, MD/PHD PRO­GRAM

BIO: While com­plet­ing her masters of science in med­i­cal bio­physics, Amanda Khan de­signed and en­gi­neered the world’s first brain ven­tri­cle MRI phantom, a de­vice that aids in the di­ag­no­sis and man­age­ment of Alzheimer’s dis­ease. Khan is now at the Uni­ver­sity of Toronto’s world-renowned MD/PhD pro­gram, where she was elected the pro­gram’s first fe­male pres­i­dent and as part of her doc­toral re­search is de­vel­op­ing a la­paro­scopic tool that au­to­mat­i­cally pre­vents sur­geons from ex­ert­ing too much force on del­i­cate body tis­sues. She was awarded the Vanier Canada Grad­u­ate Schol­ar­ship for this re­search.

EARLY AND LAST­ING LESSONS: “That you alone are on your own path in life and not to com­pare your­self to oth­ers.” WHAT IT WILL TAKE TO IN­CREASE GEN­DER EQUAL­ITY IN MY IN­DUS­TRY: “Ad­ver­tise science and en­gi­neer­ing more to­wards women early, in high school and mid­dle school.”

SARAH JA­COBS BARRS Di­rec­tor, Events KLICK INC.

BIO: Sarah Ja­cobs Barrs has been in the event in­dus­try since 2007, spe­cial­iz­ing in large-scale fundrais­ing events across North Amer­ica and help­ing to raise mil­lions of dol­lars for or­ga­ni­za­tions such as Mount Si­nai Hos­pi­tal and Sick­Kids. Since join­ing Klick in early 2015, she has led the ex­e­cu­tion of nu­mer­ous event con­cepts that have changed the face of health in­dus­try events, in­clud­ing the award-win­ning MUSE and Klick Ideas Ex­change.

ON HOW TO RAISE YOUR VOICE: “Once you’ve es­tab­lished your cred­i­bil­ity in your craft, it’s easy to get peo­ple to lis­ten, es­pe­cially if you lis­ten to them, too. Lis­ten­ing is an un­der­rated as­pect of hav­ing your voice heard.” WHO I’D TRADE PLACES WITH FOR JUST ONE DAY: “An­gela Ahrendts, the for­mer CEO of Burberry and now the only fe­male se­nior vice-pres­i­dent at the world’s big­gest tech gi­ant, Ap­ple. She’s rev­o­lu­tion­iz­ing what peo­ple al­ready be­lieve to be rev­o­lu­tion­ary and she’s suc­ceed­ing in style.”

BAI­LEY PARNELL Founder & CEO SKILLSCAMP

BIO: Bai­ley Parnell is an award-win­ning dig­i­tal mar­keter and busi­ness­woman with a pas­sion and tal­ent for help­ing peo­ple and brands tell their sto­ries bet­ter. She re­cently founded SkillsCamp, which helps peo­ple and busi­nesses de­velop the soft skills needed for pro­fes­sional suc­cess. Parnell also works in dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing at Ry­er­son Uni­ver­sity.

EARLY AND LAST­ING LESSONS: “Con­fi­dence is ev­ery­thing. Al­most all soft skills we teach come back to con­fi­dence. Every­one has a dif­fer­ent path to find­ing or main­tain­ing it, but it’s crit­i­cal to find how you can do that for your­self.” WHAT IT WILL TAKE TO IN­CREASE GEN­DER EQUAL

ITY IN MY IN­DUS­TRY: “We need more lead­ers to fol­low in the foot­steps of Glen Maz­zara, a pro­ducer who re­al­ized women weren’t speak­ing up in his writer’s room and were be­ing cut off when they did. He in­sti­tuted a ‘no-in­ter­rup­tions rule’ that sig­nif­i­cantly changed the dy­namic. We have to be in­ten­tion­ally in­clu­sive, whether that’s specif­i­cally ask­ing quiet in­di­vid­u­als what they think or in­sti­tut­ing eq­ui­typro­mot­ing poli­cies.”

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