National Post (Latest Edition)

REPEACHED

Trump impeached for second time

- David Morgan and richard cowan

Washington • Donald Trump became the first U.S. president to be impeached twice, charged with inciting an insurrecti­on just a week after a violent mob of his supporters stormed the Capitol.

The vote in the Democratic-controlled House of Representa­tives was 232-197 Wednesday, with 10 Republican­s joining the Democrats in backing impeachmen­t of the president in his waning days in power.

But it appeared unlikely that the extraordin­arily swift impeachmen­t would lead to Trump’s ouster before the Republican president’s term ends and Democratic President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurate­d on Jan. 20.

The Senate’s republican majority leader, Mitch Mcconnell, rejected democratic calls for an immediate impeachmen­t trial, saying there was no time to conclude a trial before Trump leaves office.

An hour after the vote, Trump released a video recorded in the Oval Office calling for calm and saying he was shocked and saddened by the “calamity at the Capitol.” he made no mention of impeachmen­t.

“I unequivoca­lly condemn the violence that we saw last week. Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country and no place in our movement.”

In what appeared to be a reference to his banishment from social media, he said there has been an unpreceden­ted assault on free speech in recent days and he called it wrong and dangerous.

“We need to listen to one another, not silence one another.”

The house passed a single article of impeachmen­t accusing Trump of “incitement of insurrecti­on,” focused on an incendiary speech he delivered to thousands of supporters shortly before the pro-trump mob rampaged through the Capitol on Jan. 6. The mob disrupted the formal certificat­ion of Biden’s victory over Trump in the Nov. 3 election, sent lawmakers into hiding and left five people dead, including a police officer.

During his Jan. 6 speech, Trump repeated claims that the election was fraudulent and exhorted supporters to march on the Capitol.

With thousands of rifle-carrying National Guard troops inside and outside the Capitol on Wednesday, an emotional debate unfolded in the house chamber where lawmakers had crouched under chairs and donned gas masks a week earlier.

“The president of the united States incited this insurrecti­on, this armed rebellion against our common country,” house Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a democrat, said on the house floor before the vote.

“he must go. he is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love.”

No u.s. president has ever been removed from office through impeachmen­t. Three — Trump in 2019, Bill Clinton in 1998 and Andrew Johnson in 1868 — previously were impeached by the house but acquitted by the Senate.

democratic congressma­n Julian Castro called Trump “the most dangerous man to ever occupy the Oval Office.” Congresswo­man Maxine Waters accused Trump of wanting civil war and fellow democrat Jim Mcgovern said the president “instigated an attempted coup.”

Mcconnell said in a memo to his fellow republican­s that he had not made a final decision on how he will vote on impeachmen­t in the Senate.

 ?? Jonathan Ernst / REUTERS ?? U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over the vote to impeach President Donald Trump on Wednesday.
Jonathan Ernst / REUTERS U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over the vote to impeach President Donald Trump on Wednesday.
 ?? Erin Scott / REUTERS ?? A U.S. Marine guards the West Wing of the White House,
signalling that the president is in the Oval Office.
Erin Scott / REUTERS A U.S. Marine guards the West Wing of the White House, signalling that the president is in the Oval Office.

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