play­ing this week

NOW Magazine - - MOVIES -

How to find a list­ing Movie list­ings are com­pre­hen­sive and or­ga­nized al­pha­bet­i­cally. List­ings in­clude name of film, di­rec­tor’s name in brack­ets, a re­view, run­ning time and a rat­ing. Re­views are by Nor­man Wilner (NW), Su­san G. Cole (SGC), Glenn Sumi (GS), and Radheyan Simonpillai (RS) un­less oth­er­wise spec­i­fied.

The rat­ing sys­tem is as fol­lows: NNNNN Top 10 of the year NNNN Hon­ourable men­tion NNN En­ter­tain­ing NN Medi­ocre N Bomb

Crit­ics’ pick (highly rec­om­mended) Movie the­atres are listed at the end and can be cross-ref­er­enced to our film times on page 37 or on­line at movies.nowtoronto.com AN­OTHER KIND OF WEDDING (Pat Kiely) See Also Open­ing, page 35. 86 min. Opens May 18 at Yonge & Dun­das 24 AVENGERS: IN­FIN­ITY WAR (An­thony Russo, Joe Russo) is, as promised, the thing to which it’s all been build­ing – an as­sem­blage of nearly ev­ery Marvel hero to bat­tle the alien brute Thanos (Josh Brolin), who seeks to wipe out pre­cisely half of all life in the galaxy. With the cos­mos-span­ning scale, the unimag­in­able stakes and the ev­ery­thing-bagel na­ture of the cast, In­fin­ity War sets up a state of breath­less emer­gency and keeps heap­ing cri­sis upon cri­sis – and while in­di­vid­ual se­quences are solid, the whole thing bor­ders on ex­haust­ing. 149 min. NNN (NW) Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24 BAD SA­MAR­I­TAN (Dean Devlin) has one clever shot and one great line, and they’re about 90 min­utes apart. Is it worth slog­ging through the dull, unin­spired movie in be­tween, even for David Ten­nant’s most ded­i­cated fans? Nah. Pro­ducer/di­rec­tor Devlin has no feel­ing for the cat-and-mouse genre at all – and worse, he’s got noth­ing to work with: Bran­don Boyce’s script is en­tirely lack­ing in com­plex­ity or in­no­va­tion, with un­der­de­vel­oped char­ac­ters the cast sim­ply can’t turn into in­ter­est­ing peo­ple. This is just junk. 110 min. NN (NW) Canada Square, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Queensway, Sil­verCity York­dale, Yonge & Dun­das 24

BEIRUT (Brad An­der­son) is a solid little ñ thriller about a burnt-out for­mer diplo­mat (Jon Hamm) pulled back into the rat’s nest of Le­banon circa 1982 when an old friend is taken hostage. Hamm’s great as a man des­per­ately try­ing to piece to­gether a mas­sively com­plex op­er­a­tion from the out­side, and di­rec­tor An­der­son sur­rounds him with a top-flight sup­port­ing cast, in­clud­ing Rosamund Pike, Shea Whigham and Dean Nor­ris. All in all, a very pleas­ant sur­prise. 109 min. NNNN (NW) Canada Square, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema

BLACK PAN­THER (Ryan Coogler) is to ñ

the on­go­ing Marvel project as di­rec­tor/co-writer Coogler’s Creed was to the Rocky movies – a film si­mul­ta­ne­ously be­holden to its fran­chise and alive to ev­ery pos­si­bil­ity within it, cre­at­ing a new world within the ex­ist­ing mas­ter nar­ra­tive. Chad­wick Bose­man re­mains mag­netic as hell as King T’Challa, and the knock­out cast in­cludes Michael B. Jor­dan, Leti­tia Wright, An­gela Bas­sett, For­est Whi­taker, Daniel Kalu­uya, Lupita Ny­ong’o and Danai Gurira. Go see it. Some sub­ti­tles. 134 min. NNNN (NW) Canada Square, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Im-

agine Carl­ton Cinema, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Yonge Block­ers (Kay Cannon) is a messy, fran­tic com­edy about three par­ents (Les­lie Mann, John Cena, Ike Bar­in­holtz) try­ing to keep their teen daugh­ters (Kathryn New­ton, Geral­dine Viswanathan, Gideon Adlon) from hav­ing sex on prom night. Maybe first-time di­rec­tor Cannon (who wrote the Pitch Per­fect tril­ogy) needed more time to re­work Brian and Jim Ke­hoe’s script to find the right bal­ance of feel­ing and farce. In­stead, in­ter­est­ing char­ac­ter beats are buried un­der a flood of awk­ward nude scenes and gross-out stunts. 102 min. NN (NW) Canada Square, Fox, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Queensway, Yonge & Dun­das 24 Book cluB (Bill Hol­d­er­man) See Also Open­ing, page 35. 104 min. Opens May 18 at Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24 Boom for real: The laTe TeeNage Years of JeaN-michel BasquiaT (Sara Driver) 79 min. See re­view, this page. NN (KR) Opens May 18 at Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema Borg vs. mceNroe (Janus Metz) turns the fa­mous con­fronta­tion be­tween Björn Borg and John McEnroe at Wim­ble­don in 1980 into a generic biopic drama, quickly es­tab­lish­ing that the real only dif­fer­ence be­tween Borg (Sver­rir Gud­na­son) and McEnroe (Shia LaBeouf) was that McEnroe had yet to learn to con­trol the sin­gle-mind­ed­ness that made him a great ten­nis player. I ap­pre­ci­ate what­ever Robert Emms is do­ing in the mar­gins as Vi­tas Geru­laitis; that guy’s in a much more in­ter­est­ing movie. Some sub­ti­tles. 108 min. NN (NW) TIFF Bell Light­box Break­iNg iN (James McTeigue) in­verts the Panic Room sce­nario in a sim­ple enough premise ripe for B-movie thrills. Gabrielle Union’s Shaun finds her­self on the out­side of a heav­ily for­ti­fied man­sion, while her two chil­dren are held hostage within by crim­i­nals. The house is decked out with cam­eras, mo­tion sen­sors, pro­tec­tive shields and a re­ally ter­rific sound sys­tem, but the slack movie spends more time ex­plain­ing the im­pres­sive tech than ac­tu­ally hav­ing fun with it. 88 min. NN (RS) Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Queensway, Sil­ver-

City Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Yonge & Dun­das 24 The child re­maiNs (Michael Mel­ski) is a sim­ple, ef­fec­tive hor­ror movie about an ex­pec­tant cou­ple spend­ing a re­ally bad week­end in a haunted inn, with great per­for­mances from stars Suzanne Clé­ment and Al­lan Hawco and a fine sense of East Coast at­mos­phere cour­tesy of Nova Scotia writer/ di­rec­tor Mel­ski (Char­lie Zone). No one’s try­ing to rein­vent the wheel here; the ma­chin­ery works just fine. 107 min. NNN (NW) Opens May 18 at Canada Square dead­pool 2 (David Leitch) 119 min. See re­view, this page. NNN (NW) Opens May 18 at Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24

The deaTh of sTaliN (Ar­mando ñ

Ian­nucci) reimag­ines the chaos within the Soviet Cen­tral Com­mit­tee after the death of Stalin as a bal­let of des­per­ate quis­lings and back­stab­bers, each one scram­bling to be the man who fills the power vac­uum. The dif­fer­ence be­tween this one and di­rec­tor/co-writer Ian­nucci’s pre­vi­ous vivi­sec­tions of UK and Amer­i­can pol­i­tics is that ev­ery last per­son in the room has blood on their hands, and no com­punc­tions about adding a little more. 107 min. NNNN (NW) Fox, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Re­gent The­atre, Var­sity dis­oBe­di­eNce (Se­bastián Le­lio) 114 min. See re­view, page 36. NNN (SGC) Opens May 18 at Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Var­sity

The eNd­less (Justin Ben­son, Aaron ñ

Moor­head) walks a tightrope be­tween itchy psy­cho­log­i­cal thriller and play­ful sci-fi ex­per­i­ment, and walks it very well in­deed. Co-direc­tors Ben­son and Moor­head (Res­o­lu­tion, Spring) play Justin and Aaron, for­mer mem­bers of a Cal­i­for­nia apoca­lypse cult who re­turn to the camp a decade later. The less you know about the cen­tral mys­ter­ies of The End­less, the more ef­fec­tive the ex­pe­ri­ence will be. You need to be locked in the dark with it. 112 min. NNNN (NW) Yonge & Dun­das 24 go­dard moN amour (Michel Hazanavi­cius) is a breezy love story about a film di­rec­tor who’s re­cently mar­ried his lead­ing lady and is set in France in the months lead­ing up to the mas­sive anti-gov­ern­ment street protests of May 1968. The story is based on real events de­picted in a mem­oir by Anne Wi­azem­sky. If you don’t know who Jean-Luc Go­dard is, you might be drawn in by the charm of their bud­ding re­la­tion­ship. But most do know Go­dard

(Louis Gar­rel) and the facile treat­ment of a turn­ing point in the artis­tic and po­lit­i­cal life of this cin­e­matic icon does it no jus­tice. Subti­tled. 107 min. NN (Paul En­nis) TIFF Bell Light­box The heaT: a kiTcheN (r)evo­lu­TioN (Maya Gal­lus) spot­lights the ob­sta­cles faced by seven women try­ing to build ca­reers as chefs and cre­ate change from within a ma­cho in­dus­try. Among them are lo­cals Suzanne Barr, who Gal­lus catches in tran­si­tion be­tween restau­rants; ex-cook Ivy Knight, who shares a jaw-drop­ping tale of abuse in the kitchen; and Char­lotte Lan­g­ley, who points out that fe­male chefs, too, face the temp­ta­tion to trash-talk, bully and ob­jec­tify as they gain power. Gal­lus doesn’t go too deep on any one of the film’s sub­jects, which lim­its the film in terms of dra­matic push and pull, but view­ers will still walk away with a deeper un­der­stand­ing of a com­plex sys­temic is­sue. Some sub­ti­tles. 75 min. NNN (Natalia Manzocco) Screen­ing se­lect days at Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema i feel preTTY (Abby Kohn, Marc Sil­ver­stein) takes some in­ter­est­ing ideas about in­se­cu­rity and em­pow­er­ment and buries them in a high-con­cept, low-yield com­edy where Amy Schumer’s drab, un­happy Re­nee bumps her head at SoulCy­cle and wakes up con­vinced she’s been trans­formed into a fash­ion model. Schumer does her best with the ma­te­rial, and she gets some de­cent scene part­ners in Rory Scovel as Re­nee’s be­mused love in­ter­est and Michelle Wil­liams as a per­pet­u­ally un­der­es­ti­mated cos­met­ics heir who hires Re­nee as a re­cep­tion­ist. But they’re all trapped in a movie that just isn’t do­ing what it thinks it is. 110 min. NN (NW) Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Yonge & Dun­das 24

iN­diaN horse (Stephen Cam­pan­elli) adapts the late Richard Wagamese’s novel about an Ojibwe kid who gets a chance to escape a res­i­den­tial school by play­ing hockey. Well-mean­ing but ul­ti­mately su­per­fi­cial, the film re­lates the events of the story but misses out on the res­o­nance as it tries to pack as much of Wagamese’s book

into the space of a fea­ture. It has its mo­ments, but there’s no doubt in my mind that the story would be better served at minis­eries length. 101 min. NNN (NW) Canada Square, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square

Isle Of DOgs (Wes An­der­son) finds ñ

writer/di­rec­tor An­der­son re­turn­ing to stop-mo­tion an­i­ma­tion al­most a decade after Fan­tas­tic Mr. Fox and de­liv­er­ing a film with even more heart and beauty – it’s as glo­ri­ous and lay­ered an en­ter­tain­ment as An­der­son’s last live-ac­tion ven­ture, The Grand Bu­dapest Ho­tel. And Bryan Cranston’s rue­ful turn as a master­less stray slowly bond­ing with a 12-yearold boy (Koyu Rankin) gives the film a warmth that lingers long after the lights come up. Isle Of Dogs. Say it slowly. Some sub­ti­tles. 101 min. NNNNN (NW) Fox, Kingsway The­atre, Re­gent The­atre, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24 KUsAMA: IN­fIN­ITY (Heather Lenz) packs a lot into 76 min­utes about the life of ubiq­ui­tous Ja­panese artist Yayoi Kusama, who shot to fame more than two decades after she should have. It’s a straight­for­ward doc biopic, but the art-world voices whose sound bites ef­fec­tively write her back into the his­tory of pop art and min­i­mal­ism – which she was left out of due to sex­ism and racism – make this film a sat­is­fy­ing watch. Some sub­ti­tles. 76 min. NNN (Kevin Ritchie) Mt Pleas­ant, TIFF Bell Light­box lIfe Of THe pARTY (Ben Fal­cone) is a lot like Melissa Mc­Carthy’s last solo ve­hi­cle, The Boss, which she also co-wrote and co­pro­duced with her hus­band, di­rec­tor Fal­cone,

in that it’s less of a movie than a col­lec­tion of sketches or­ga­nized around a char­ac­ter, slapped to­gether with little re­gard for struc­ture or con­ti­nu­ity. It’s a mess, but it works, and Mc­Carthy is gen­uinely great at find­ing the hon­est mo­ments in the per­sonal evo­lu­tion of her Mid­west­ern house­wife turned mid­dle-aged col­lege se­nior. 105 min. NNN (NW) Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Yonge & Dun­das 24

A MAN Of IN­TegRITY (Mo­ham­mad Ra­soulof) See Also Open­ing, page 35. 117 min.

Opens May 18 at TIFF Bell Light­box PoPe Fran­cis: a Man oF His Word (Wim Wen­ders) is shame­lessly cud­dly and gen­uinely inspiring. We see Fran­cis kiss­ing the feet of Phil­a­del­phia’s in­car­cer­ated and pe­ti­tion­ing U.S. Congress to ac­cept im­mi­grants. Fran­cis ad­vo­cates sol­i­dar­ity with the LGBT com­mu­nity and gen­der equal­ity and cham­pi­ons eco­log­i­cal preser­va­tion. Fran­cis is a rad­i­cal – but rad­i­cals de­serve dis­sent, too, and there’s none in Wen­ders’s por­trait. Noth­ing is said about re­pro­duc­tive rights or how Fran­cis’s mes­sage might af­fect pol­icy. Still, see this film, ar­gue with it, try to take it at its word. 96 min. nnn (José Teodoro) Opens May 18 at Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Var­sity a Quiet Place (John Krasin­ski) is a postapoc­a­lyp­tic hor­ror film in which a fam­ily strives to be as quiet as pos­si­ble to avoid be­ing con­sumed by car­niv­o­rous crea­tures who are blind but pos­sess highly sen­si­tive hear­ing. There’s no ge­nius at work in the film; rather, its ef­fec­tive­ness arises from the elim­i­na­tion of ev­ery­thing inessen­tial and a steady fo­cus on teamwork both on and off-screen. 90 min. nnn (José Teodoro) Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24

raM­Page (Brad Pey­ton) is ex­actly what it wants to be: a movie made from the 90s video game where a bunch of mon­sters smash a city, with Dwayne John­son and a few other peo­ple run­ning around try­ing to min­i­mize the car­nage. Is it art? Nah. But peo­ple who found Gareth Ed­wards’s Godzilla too oblique in its mon­ster bat­tles are go­ing to love it. 107 min. nnn (NW) Canada Square, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity York­dale rBg (Betsy West, Julie Co­hen) 97 min. See re­view, page 35. nnn (NW) Canada Square, Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema, TIFF Bell Light­box ready Player one (Steven Spiel­berg) adapts Ernest Cline’s geek­tas­tic novel about peo­ple at­tempt­ing to solve an in­tri­cate puz­zle in a vir­tual re­al­ity world where all the clues in­volve 80s pop cul­ture. As in the novel, the real world dys­topia is vague, but the chal­lenges – mostly in­volv­ing movies and video games – are lots of fun. The ac­tion se­quences are im­pres­sively re­al­ized but of­ten mo­not­o­nous. And di­rec­tor Spiel­berg, al­though he helped cre­ate the uni­verse the char­ac­ters are cel­e­brat­ing, di­rects with­out ex­u­ber­ance. 140 min. nnn (GS) Canada Square, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Fox, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Queensway, Sco­tia­bank The­atre, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge

ñ re­venge (Co­ralie Fargeat) is a con­fi­dent, fem­i­nist ex­e­cu­tion of the rap­ere­venge ex­ploita­tion genre, with writer/ di­rec­tor Fargeat fil­ter­ing sex­ist garbage like I Spit On Your Grave through the lens of the New French Ex­trem­ity. A young Amer­i­can (Matilda Lutz) sur­vives an as­sault at a desert get­away to ex­act bloody re­venge on the men who be­trayed her. It’s an al­most el­e­men­tal treat­ment, re­duc­ing the story to ac­tion and re­ac­tion, suf­fer­ing and ret­ri­bu­tion – and Fargeat does not skimp on the gore. Subti­tled. 108 min. nnnn (NW) Yonge & Dun­das 24 tHe rider (Chloé Zhao) is writer/pro­ducer/di­rec­tor Zhao’s lat­est ex­am­i­na­tion of mas­culin­ity and self-im­age in the modern West, cast­ing Brady Jan­dreau as a ver­sion of him­self: a South Dakota horse­man try­ing to re­sume his old life after a suf­fer­ing a dev­as­tat­ing head in­jury. Zhao sit­u­ates The Rider in a fully lived-in world, and the story’s arc is clear and en­gag­ing. But while Jan­dreau and sev­eral other cast mem­bers are en­tirely con­vinc­ing as rodeo cow­boys and horse train­ers, they strug­gle with their di­a­logue – and with the film’s larger metaphor. 103 min. nnn (NW) TIFF Bell Light­box tHe seag­ull (Michael Mayer) is a rare foray into moviemak­ing from Tony-win­ning stage di­rec­tor Mayer (Spring Awak­en­ing), who casts An­nette Ben­ing, Brian Den­nehy, Elis­a­beth Moss, Corey Stoll and On Ch­e­sil Beach co-stars Billy Howle and Saoirse Ro­nan in an adap­ta­tion of the Chekhov clas­sic about the emo­tional tan­gles of an ex­tended fam­ily in the Rus­sian coun­try­side. Ev­ery­one’s very good – ex­cept for Howle, who goes full Red­mayne as the in­dig­nant Kon­stantin and nearly de­rails the film. 99 min. nnn (NW) Var­sity sHer­lock gnoMes (John Steven­son) is a snooze-wor­thy se­quel to 2011’s Gnomeo & Juliet in which the for­merly star-crossed lovers (voiced by James McAvoy and Emily Blunt) help out Baker Street’s most fa­mous de­tec­tive (Johnny Depp) and his as­sis­tant, Dr. Wat­son (Chi­we­tel Ejio­for), when Lon­don’s gnomes start mys­te­ri­ously dis­ap­pear­ing. The story plays out with all the ex­cite­ment of a Scooby-Doo episode. Un­like the first film, there’s no com­pelling theme un­der­ly­ing this fol­low-up, and sev­eral se­quences serve no dis­cernible pur­pose ex­cept to rip off the Toy Story movies. 84 min. nn (GS) Canada Square, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Fox, Kingsway The­atre, Queensway, Revue, Sil­verCity Fairview, Yonge & Dun­das 24 sHoW dogs (Raja Gos­nell) See Also Open­ing, page 35. 92 min. Opens May 18 at Beach Cin­e­mas, Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema, Imag­ine Mar­ket Square, Queensway, Sil­verCity Fairview, Sil­verCity Yonge, Sil­verCity York­dale, Yonge & Dun­das 24

tully (Ja­son Reit­man) re­unites Reit­man with his Young Adult screen­writer Diablo Cody and star Char­l­ize Theron for a plod­ding, life­less drama about an ex­hausted mother of three whose life is made eas­ier by the ar­rival of an open-hearted night nanny (Macken­zie Davis). Theron and Davis do ev­ery­thing they can to bring their char­ac­ters to messy life, but Cody’s script never raises it­self above room tone – and then tries to jus­tify its mud­dled bland­ness with a plot twist so tired that it’s ba­si­cally an in­sult to a pay­ing au­di­ence. 95 min. nn (NW) Canada Square, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Imag­ine Prom­e­nade Mall, Queensway, Sil­verCity Yonge, Var­sity, Yonge & Dun­das 24 venus (Eisha Mar­jara) 95 min. See re­view, page 36. nnn (Kevin Ritchie) Opens May 18 at Yonge & Dun­das 24 a Wrin­kle in tiMe (Ava DuVer­nay) fol­lows Meg, a rare mixed-race hero­ine on a jour­ney that is as much about self-love and find­ing strength in what makes her unique as it is about skip­ping through di­men­sions that in­ter­mit­tently re­sem­ble Oz, Pan­dora and Leave It To Beaver’s Amer­ica. The lat­ter stuff is a dis­tract­ing se­ries of CGI-heavy scene changes that, while nifty to look at, can’t work up won­der or ex­cite­ment. But young kids prob­a­bly won’t mind all that. Meg rep­re­sents! Her clear emo­tional bass line is some­thing to hang and hold onto. 109 min. nnn (RS) Canada Square, Eglin­ton Town Cen­tre, Queensway, Yonge & Dun­das 24

you Were never re­ally Here ñ

(Lynne Ram­say) is both pulp re­venge thriller about a finder of lost chil­dren whose lat­est job goes side­ways, and an art­ful study of a man des­per­ately seek­ing an end to his own tor­ment. Writer/di­rec­tor Ram­say’s ec­cen­tric­i­ties serve the ma­te­rial, in­fus­ing stan­dard ac­tion beats with queasy dread and an un­nerv­ing oblique­ness, and Joaquin Phoenix de­liv­ers a mas­ter­ful per­for­mance as the weary, hulk­ing hero. 90 min. nnnn (NW) Cine­plex Cin­e­mas Empress Walk, Imag­ine Carl­ton Cinema

Diane Keaton (left), Candice Ber­gen, Jane Fonda and Mary Steen­bur­gen ex­plore shades of Grey in Book Club.

Frances Fisher (left) and Kath­leen Turner ex­pe­ri­ence An­other Kind Of Wedding.

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