Ottawa Citizen

Art on wheels eye catching — and street legal

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British artist Andy Hazell is turning heads with a series of art car projects he’s developed over the past few years.

Those wheels include a Vauxhall Corsa supporting a six-metre metal f ish, a Citroën VX spaceship conversion and a Gazelle helicopter transforme­d into a fly and shoehorned on to a Japanese minivan.

His latest automotive creation is a second-hand hearse topped with an illuminate­d cathedral.

“I dubbed it the Temple of Plastic Excess,” says Hazell, who built the car for a parade in Newcastle.

The street-legal project took three intensive weeks to build, incorporat­es moving parts and is illuminate­d by more than 4,000 LEDs, which operate in sequence.

“I’d previously built the Citroën Spaceship, which made small boys get over-excited,” he says.

“With this project, I tried to imagine what Barbie and Ken would use for wedding transport.”

 ?? ANDY HAZELL ?? This second-hand hearse, topped with an illuminate­d cathedral, is called the Temple of Plastic Excess and was built for a parade. The street-legal project took three weeks to build.
ANDY HAZELL This second-hand hearse, topped with an illuminate­d cathedral, is called the Temple of Plastic Excess and was built for a parade. The street-legal project took three weeks to build.

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