Ottawa Citizen

Stormin’ Norman epit­o­mized ‘duty, ser­vice, coun­try’ creed

Dec­o­rated gen­eral kept a low pro­file when he re­tired from the army, but he wasn’t afraid to give his opin­ion about the Pen­tagon. RICHARD PYLE and LOLITA C. BALDOR report.

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Repit­o­mized the ‘duty, ser­vice, coun­try’ creed that has de­fended our free­dom and seen this great na­tion through our most try­ing in­ter­na­tional crises,” Bush said in a state­ment. “More than that, he was a good and de­cent man — and a dear friend.”

At the peak of his post­war na­tional celebrity, Sch­warzkopf — a self-pro­claimed po­lit­i­cal in­de­pen­dent — re­jected sug­ges­tions that he run for of­fice, and re­mained far more pri­vate than other gen­er­als, although he did serve briefly as a mil­i­tary com­men­ta­tor for NBC.

While fo­cused pri­mar­ily in his later years on char­i­ta­ble en­ter­prises, he cam­paigned for Pres­i­dent Ge­orge W. Bush in 2000 but was am­biva­lent about the 2003 in­va­sion of Iraq, say­ing he doubted vic­tory would be as easy as the White House and Pen­tagon pre­dicted. In early 2003 he told the Washington Post the out­come was an un­known: “What is post­war Iraq go­ing to look like, with the Kurds and the Sun­nis and the Shi­ites? That’s a huge ques­tion, to my mind. It really should be part of the over­all cam­paign plan,” he said.

Ini­tially, Sch­warzkopf had en­dorsed the in­va­sion, say­ing he was con­vinced that former Sec­re­tary of State Colin Pow­ell had given the United Na­tions pow­er­ful ev­i­dence of Iraqi weapons of mass de­struc­tion. Af­ter that proved false, he said de­ci­sions to go to war should de­pend on what UN weapons in­spec­tors found.

He sel­dom spoke up dur­ing the con­flict, but in late 2004, he sharply crit­i­cized then-de­fence sec­re­tary Don­ald Rums­feld and the Pen­tagon for mis­takes that in­cluded in­ad­e­quate train­ing for Army re­servists sent to Iraq and for er­ro­neous judg­ments about Iraq.

“In the fi­nal anal­y­sis I think we are be­hind sched­ule. ... I don’t think we counted on it turn­ing into ji­had (holy war),” he said in an NBC in­ter­view.

Sch­warzkopf was born Aug. 24, 1934, in Tren­ton, N.J., where his fa­ther, Col. H. Norman Sch­warzkopf Jr., founder and com­man­der of the New Jersey State Po­lice, was then lead­ing the in­ves­ti­ga­tion of the Lind­bergh kid­nap case, which ended with the ar­rest and 1936 ex­e­cu­tion of Ger­man-born car­pen­ter Richard Haupt­mann for kid­nap­ping and mur­der­ing the famed avi­a­tor’s in­fant son.

The el­der Sch­warzkopf was named Her­bert, but when the son was asked what his “H” stood for, he would re­ply, “H.” Although re­puted to be short-tem­pered with aides and sub­or­di­nates, he was a friendly, talk­a­tive and even jovial fig­ure who didn’t like Stormin’ Norman and pre­ferred to be known as “the Bear,” a so­bri­quet given him by troops.

He also was out­spo­ken at times, in­clud­ing when he de­scribed Gen. Wil­liam West­more­land, the U.S. com­man­der in Viet­nam, as “a horse’s ass” in an As­so­ci­ated Press in­ter­view.

Sch­warzkopf and his wife, Brenda, had three chil­dren: Cyn­thia, Jes­sica and Chris­tian. etired Gen. H. Norman Sch­warzkopf, who topped an il­lus­tri­ous mil­i­tary ca­reer by com­mand­ing the U.S.-led in­ter­na­tional coali­tion that drove Sad­dam Hus­sein’s forces out of Kuwait in 1991 but kept a low pub­lic pro­file in con­tro­ver­sies over the sec­ond Gulf War against Iraq, died Thurs­day. He was 78.

Sch­warzkopf died in Tampa, Fla., where he had lived in re­tire­ment, ac­cord­ing to a U.S. of­fi­cial, who was not au­tho­rized to re­lease the in­for­ma­tion pub­licly and spoke on con­di­tion of anonymity.

A much-dec­o­rated com­bat sol­dier in Viet­nam, Sch­warzkopf was known pop­u­larly as “Stormin’ Norman” for a no­to­ri­ously ex­plo­sive tem­per.

He served in his last mil­i­tary as­sign­ment in Tampa as com­man­derin-chief of U.S. Cen­tral Com­mand, the head­quar­ters re­spon­si­ble for U.S. mil­i­tary and se­cu­rity con­cerns in nearly 20 coun­tries from the east­ern Mediter­ranean and Africa to Pak­istan.

Sch­warzkopf be­came “CINC-Cent­com” in 1988 and when Sad­dam Hus­sein in­vaded Kuwait three years later to pun­ish it for al­legedly steal­ing Iraqi oil re­serves, he com­manded Op­er­a­tion Desert Storm, the coali­tion of some 30 coun­tries or­ga­nized by Pres­i­dent Ge­orge H.W. Bush that suc­ceeded in driv­ing the Iraqis out.

“Gen. Norm Sch­warzkopf, to me,

 ?? BOB DAUGH­ERTY/THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS FILES ?? Gen. H. Norman Sch­warzkopf, shown at ease with his tank troops in 1991 in Saudi Arabia dur­ing Op­er­a­tion Desert Storm, died Thurs­day, in Tampa, Fla. Sch­warzkopf, who led the coali­tion forces, was 78.
BOB DAUGH­ERTY/THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS FILES Gen. H. Norman Sch­warzkopf, shown at ease with his tank troops in 1991 in Saudi Arabia dur­ing Op­er­a­tion Desert Storm, died Thurs­day, in Tampa, Fla. Sch­warzkopf, who led the coali­tion forces, was 78.

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