A guide for those get­ting mar­ried for the sec­ond time

Prairie Post (East Edition) - - Seniors - METRO

Tak­ing a chance on love and mar­riage for the sec­ond (or third) time is cer­tainly wor­thy of cel­e­bra­tion. The Pew Re­search Cen­ter re­ports that at least four in 10 new marriages now in­clude at least one part­ner who has been mar­ried be­fore, a trend that is on the rise.

Plan­ning a sec­ond wed­ding can be chal­leng­ing, as in­di­vid­u­als may be wor­ried about proper eti­quette, su­per­sti­tions or meet­ing the ex­pec­ta­tions of oth­ers. But there are no hard rules govern­ing sec­ond wed­dings. Now that cou­ples are older and a bit more ex­pe­ri­enced, wed­ding plan­ning may be met with greater en­thu­si­asm and pa­tience. These tips can help the process along.

• Dress it up. Brides need not es­chew white if they pre­fer to wear it for their sec­ond wed­dings. White, cream, ivory, or other shades are per­fectly ac­cept­able. Also, brides can make their gowns as lav­ish or as sim­plis­tic as they de­sire. The length and style of the dress should re­flect the for­mal­ity and scope of the event.

• Make it unique. Cou­ples who have been mar­ried be­fore may want to set this new oc­ca­sion apart from their pre­vi­ous wed­dings. Brides mag­a­zine ex­perts sug­gest dis­cussing pre­vi­ous cel­e­bra­tions and what can be done dif­fer­ently this time around. Cou­ples can use this op­por­tu­nity to get to know each other more in­ti­mately by per­son­al­iz­ing their fes­tiv­i­ties.

• Don’t feel be­holden to in­ti­mate af­fairs. Sec­ond wed­dings tend to be more in­ti­mate, as guest lists tend to be smaller and cou­ples ty­ing the knot again may pre­fer more in­ti­macy and less hus­tle and bus­tle. But cou­ples should not avoid invit­ing peo­ple sim­ply be­cause sec­ond wed­dings are typ­i­cally small af­fairs. In­vite as many friends and fam­ily as you want and as your bud­get al­lows.

• Set up a reg­istry. Es­tab­lished cou­ples may have the house­hold ba­sics al­ready in place, but reg­istries can in­clude fun or en­ter­tain­ing gifts that speak to cou­ples’ in­ter­ests. These may in­clude home the­ater sys­tems, fancy cook­ware, ath­letic equip­ment, or even funds for travel.

• In­volve the chil­dren. Cou­ples who have chil­dren can make them a spe­cial part of their sec­ond wed­ding cel­e­bra­tions. Kids can play any role in the cer­e­mony, depend­ing on their age. If the sec­ond mar­riage comes after an am­i­ca­ble di­vorce, cou­ples can in­vite their for­mer spouses to pro­vide sup­port to their chil­dren so they can feel com­fort­able in the wed­ding.

• Be pre­pared. The mar­riage ap­pli­ca­tion process is sim­i­lar the sec­ond time around, but ad­di­tional doc­u­ments, such as a di­vorce de­cree or death cer­tifi­cate, may be nec­es­sary. These le­gal doc­u­ments also will be needed for men and women who in­tend to change their last names after get­ting mar­ried.

A sec­ond mar­riage de­serves as much cel­e­bra­tion as the first and gives cou­ples an op­por­tu­nity to ex­press their love for each other and their ap­pre­ci­a­tion to their friends and fam­i­lies.

Metro photo

A sec­ond mar­riage de­serves as much cel­e­bra­tion as the first and gives cou­ples an op­por­tu­nity to ex­press their love for each other and their ap­pre­ci­a­tion to their friends and fam­i­lies.

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