Prairie Post (East Edition)

Coun­cil ap­proves ex­tra fund­ing for un­ex­pected de­sign change to ma­jor project

- By Matthew Lieben­berg mlieben­berg@prairiepos­t.com Business · Ecology · Social Issues · Society · Swift Current · Canadian Pacific Railway · Saskatchewan · Water Security · Fisheries and Oceans Canada

An un­ex­pected deasign change is in­creas­ing the engi­neer­ing cost of a project to col­lect and dis­pose sludge and back­wash wa­ter from the City of Swift Cur­rent’s wa­ter treat­ment plant.

Coun­cil­lors ap­proved the scope change and ad­di­tional engi­neer­ing fee dur­ing a reg­u­lar coun­cil meet­ing via video con­fer­ence, Feb. 8.

MPE Engi­neer­ing Ltd. of Saska­toon was ap­pointed in March 2020 to pro­vide engi­neer­ing ser­vices for the wa­ter treat­ment plant resid­ual man­age­ment project. The orig­i­nal fee for th­ese ser­vices was $101,685.86 (PST in­cluded, GST ex­cluded).

The scope change means an ad­di­tional fee of $158,152 (PST in­cluded, GST ex­cluded) will be paid to the com­pany.

The pur­pose of the project is to col­lect clar­i­fier sludge and chlo­ri­nated fil­ter back­wash wa­ter from the wa­ter treat­ment plant for dis­posal at the City’s waste wa­ter treat­ment plant.

City Gen­eral Man­ager of In­fra­struc­ture and Oper­a­tions Mitch Minken pro­vided de­tails about the rea­son for the project scope change.

MPE Engi­neer­ing car­ried out hy­draulic mod­el­ling dur­ing the pre­lim­i­nary de­sign phase and de­ter­mined the waste wa­ter lift sta­tion at the north­west cor­ner of the Chi­nook golf course park­ing lot and the san­i­tary grav­ity sewer do not have ad­e­quate ca­pac­ity for the resid­u­als from the wa­ter treat­ment plant.

The com­pany there­fore looked at three al­ter­na­tive lo­ca­tions and iden­ti­fied the san­i­tary sewer main at the cor­ner of Knight Cres­cent and Fen­tons Drive as the best op­tion.

“This tie-in point uti­lizes a 375 mm san­i­tary sewer main that ser­vices the McIn­tyre in­dus­trial park,” Minken noted. “The san­i­tary sewer main will have am­ple ca­pac­ity for wa­ter treat­ment plant resid­u­als and in­dus­trial park san­i­tary re­quire­ments.”

A force main with a length of 1,800 me­tres will be in­stalled to pump resid­u­als from the wa­ter treat­ment plant.

“With the change in project scope, there will be ad­di­tional de­tailed de­sign, geotech­ni­cal in­ves­ti­ga­tion and site in­spec­tions, which re­late to the al­tered pipe­line align­ment,” he said. “This scope change will also in­clude project man­age­ment and Wa­ter Se­cu­rity Agency per­mit­ting.”

A sig­nif­i­cant por­tion of the cost of the scope change will be due to the new pipe­line route. The cross­ing of a CP Rail spur line rep­re­sents $79,200 of the to­tal cost of the ad­di­tional engi­neer­ing fee. A hor­i­zon­tal drill will be used to tun­nel un­der­neath the spur line and there will be no dis­rup­tion of rail ser­vice.

Coun­cil­lor Pat Friesen felt it was a good thing that this scope change took place be­fore the start of the con­struc­tion phase for the wa­ter treat­ment plant resid­ual man­age­ment project, which will be an ex­pense of $2 mil­lion in the City’s 2021 cap­i­tal bud­get.

“When I looked at this, I found it was un­for­tu­nate that we are go­ing to have to spend an­other $160,000 in engi­neer­ing costs, but in say­ing that, I'm pretty happy we found out now that they checked it,” she said. “They found out that we needed to move it do a dif­fer­ent lo­ca­tion, be­cause other­wise we could have spent $2 mil­lion and had a big prob­lem when we were done.”

Coun­cil­lor Ryan Plewis said this ad­di­tional ex­pense for engi­neer­ing fees and the larger $2 mil­lion bud­get for the en­tire project are typ­i­cal ex­am­ples of ex­pen­di­ture in the City’s an­nual bud­get.

“It's just one great ex­am­ple of how th­ese in­fra­struc­ture dol­lars are just so mas­sive that we deal with,” he noted. “There are no easy de­ci­sions here. This is not a job where the de­ci­sions are ob­vi­ous nec­es­sar­ily or they come to you, but they're all nec­es­sary, and un­for­tu­nately, we have an in­fi­nite list of needs and a very fi­nite abil­ity to get those things done.”

Coun­cil mem­bers agreed the City will have no choice but to con­tinue with this $2 mil­lion project in the 2021 cap­i­tal bud­get, be­cause it is re­quired due to up­dated en­vi­ron­men­tal stan­dards. The City is cur­rently re­leas­ing the clar­i­fier sludge and chlo­ri­nated fil­ter back­wash wa­ter into the Swift Cur­rent Creek, but the re­vised Depart­ment of Fish­eries and Oceans and the Saskatchew­an Wa­ter Se­cu­rity reg­u­la­tions will not al­low this to hap­pen in the fu­ture.

The sludge and back­wash wa­ter must now be col­lected, and the Wa­ter Se­cu­rity Agency re­quires the com­ple­tion of the City’s resid­ual man­age­ment sys­tem by March 31, 2022.

“An­other great ex­am­ple of some­thing we deal with as a coun­cil all the time is reg­u­la­tory change,” Plewis said. “The

en­tire pur­pose of the over­all project is that en­vi­ron­men­tal stan­dards have changed. So at the flick of a pen in the leg­is­la­ture, in the bu­reau­cracy some­where, we've had a reg­u­la­tory change. And that reg­u­la­tory change has meant very sig­nif­i­cant things for the City of Swift Cur­rent in this case.”

The new ar­range­ment af­ter the com­ple­tion of the en­tire project will be to pump the resid­u­als to the la­goon cells at the City’s waste wa­ter treat­ment plant.

Mayor Al Bri­dal added that the en­tire cost of the project will ac­tu­ally be close to $3 mil­lion when all the work is com­pleted, be­cause an­other $550,000 will be spend on lift sta­tion up­grades.

Minken said the re-rout­ing of lift sta­tion num­ber seven is re­quired for sev­eral rea­sons, in­clud­ing the need to ac­com­mo­date the ad­di­tional ca­pac­ity from the flow of sludge and back­wash wa­ter from the wa­ter treat­ment plant.

“One is for ad­di­tional growth, both by Cy­press Point and as well as the South Munro in­dus­trial,” he ex­plained. “So those lift sta­tions re­quire up­grades due to those rea­sons, as well as now with the ad­di­tional flow from the wa­ter treat­ment plan resid­u­als.”

 ?? Photo by ?? Swift Cur­rent coun­cil mem­bers raise their hands to vote on a mo­tion dur­ing the reg­u­lar coun­cil meet­ing via video con­fer­ence, Feb. 8.
Photo by Swift Cur­rent coun­cil mem­bers raise their hands to vote on a mo­tion dur­ing the reg­u­lar coun­cil meet­ing via video con­fer­ence, Feb. 8.

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