Points to Pon­der

Reader's Digest (Canada) - - Contents - BY CHRISTINA PALAS­SIO

I don’t re­ally be­lieve that any­thing is or­di­nary—I think ev­ery­thing is com­plex and wor­thy of con­jec­ture and wor­thy of a close look. I re­ally be­lieve that you could imag­ine the se­crets of the uni­verse by look­ing at a pile of grapes.

The late still-life pain­ter

MARY PRATT

The fact that I skated was a rea­son I got bul­lied, but at the same time, it was some­thing I loved to do so much. It was an es­cape. For me it was a safe space. Out on the ice, noth­ing could reach me.

Fig­ure skater ERIC RAD­FORD, the first openly gay ath­lete to take home an Olympic gold medal, to CBC Sports

If you spend all your time think­ing about whether some­thing could make a lot of money, you’re go­ing to be in trou­ble be­cause very few things do. Un­less you’re Dwayne John­son.

Ac­tress NEVE CAMP­BELL, to Fash­ion, on how she chooses roles

Forced celibacy sim­ply doesn’t work. The fact has been am­ply proved and re­proved. Most priests don’t man­age to re­main chaste. They try and fail. The truth must be con­fronted and the in­iq­ui­tous dogma buried once and for all. Given that lives are de­stroyed wher­ever it holds sway, it is crim­i­nal to pre­var­i­cate and pro­cras­ti­nate.

Writer NANCY HUS­TON, in an open

let­ter to Pope Fran­cis in The Globe and Mail

Let’s re­mem­ber when we see the term “asy­lum seeker,” that is a fel­low hu­man be­ing in ter­ri­ble dis­tress re­ly­ing on an an­cient right that we deny at great

peril to our own hu­man­ity. For­mer for­eign min­is­ter LLOYD AX­WOR­THY and for­mer at­tor­ney gen­eral AL­LAN ROCK,

in The Globe and Mail

I think we tend to only care about the op­pres­sion of peo­ple when sto­ries of trauma or bru­tal­ity or vi­o­lence are ex­posed, as op­posed to when peo­ple who are op­pressed just want to have a con­ver­sa­tion about their op­pres­sion.

Au­thor and ac­tivist VIVEK SHRAYA, in Fash­ion

It was per­fect…Be­cause if you go into a com­edy club wear­ing a baby, who’s go­ing to tell you to take it off?

Co­me­dian KATHER­INE RYAN on what it felt like to take her three-week-old daugh­ter with her

on­stage at her first paid com­edy gig

Mine is the face of medicine now. When you go to a hos­pi­tal to­day, the face you are very likely to see is fe­male and of a dif­fer­ent eth­nic­ity.

New Cana­dian Med­i­cal As­so­ci­a­tion pres­i­dent DR. GIGI OSLER, on

the rise of non-white fe­male doc­tors, in The Globe and Mail

Hu­mour al­lows you to ad­dress taboos. In Que­bec the ul­ti­mate ta­boo is iden­tity.

Co­me­dian SUGAR SAMMY

on lan­guage laws in Que­bec

[Con­ser­va­tive Party leader] An­drew [Scheer] made a clear prom­ise, that peo­ple re­lied upon, that a govern­ment of Con­ser­va­tive mem­bers would not in­tro­duce abor­tion leg­is­la­tion. Very im­por­tant to me. And we’re not go­ing to go back on it.

Con­ser­va­tive MP LISA RAITT, after a pro­posal that could have re­opened the abor­tion

de­bate failed at the party’s Au­gust pol­icy con­ven­tion

Most com­pa­nies think they need to be per­fectly ready to pro­vide an “ac­ces­si­ble” space for dis­abled work­ers. The re­al­ity is dis­abled peo­ple know what they need to be suc­cess­ful. Com­pa­nies only need to lis­ten and ad­just to those needs.

Dis­abil­ity ad­vo­cate

RICH DONO­VAN, au­thor of Un­leash Dif­fer­ent: Achiev­ing busi­ness suc­cess through dis­abil­ity

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