TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

Sentinel-Review (Woodstock) - - NEWS -

In 1530, Car­di­nal Thomas Wolsey, ad­viser to King Henry VIII of Eng­land, died. He had fallen out of the king’s favour be­cause of his fail­ure to se­cure an an­nul­ment from the pope for the king’s mar­riage to Catharine of Aragon.

In 1760, France for­mally trans­ferred Detroit to Bri­tish con­trol.

In 1798, the leg­is­la­ture of the Is­land of St. John voted to change its name to Prince Ed­ward Is­land. The name was cho­sen in hon­our of Prince Ed­ward, Duke of Kent, who was sta­tioned with the army in Hal­i­fax at the time. It was felt that the change was nec­es­sary be­cause the Is­land was be­ing con­fused with Saint John, N.B. and St. John’s, N.L.

In 1814, the “Lon­don Times” be­came the first news­pa­per to be printed by a steam-pow­ered press.

In 1818, Ge­orge Brown, jour­nal­ist and Fa­ther of Con­fed­er­a­tion, was born at Al­loa, Scot­land.

In 1832, Louisa May Al­cott, author of “Lit­tle Women,” was born in Ger­man­town, Pa.

In 1855, the Grand Trunk Rail­way com­pleted the line be­tween Mon­treal and Brockville.

In 1864, a Colorado mili­tia killed at least 150 peace­ful Cheyenne In­di­ans in the Sand Creek Mas­sacre.

In 1898, Bri­tish aca­demic and chil­dren’s author C.S. Lewis was born.

In 1916, the Na­tional Re­search Coun­cil of Canada was es­tab­lished at Ot­tawa.

In 1924, in the first hockey game played at the Mon­treal Fo­rum, the Mon­treal Cana­di­ens beat the Toronto St. Pats 7-1.

In 1929, U.S. Ad­mi­ral Richard Byrd be­came the first man to fly over the South Pole. Three years ear­lier, Byrd made the first flight over the North Pole.

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