Top 10 Travel Tips

For RVing on Baja

Snowbirds & RV Travelers - - Contents - WORDS AND PHO­TOS BY DAN AND LISA GOY

We have been RVing on Baja since 1985, op­er­at­ing our Car­a­van Tour service since 2009 and have driven Hwy 1 over 50 times. We do not know ev­ery­thing; how­ever, we have wit­nessed much and are happy to share the fol­low­ing:

BE PRE­PARED BE­FORE DE­PAR­TURE

We rec­om­mend you pur­chase a map, camp­ing book (Camp­ing Mex­ico’s Baja), a Mex­i­can phrase book, and get Baja on your GPS if you have one. We have ac­tu­ally met RVers on the road in Baja with none of the above and no clue where they are, or where they are go­ing.

Make sure your RV is in good shape and ev­ery­thing works, there are no Camp­ing Worlds on Baja. Mex­i­can ve­hi­cle li­a­bil­ity in­sur­ance is a must, we use Baja Bound and there are sev­eral other rep­utable providers on line. Driv­ing in Mex­ico with­out in­sur­ance sig­nif­i­cantly in­creases your chances of see­ing the in­side of a Mex­i­can jail.

COM­PLETE YOUR MEX­I­CAN TOURIST CARD

Cana­di­ans trav­el­ling on reg­u­lar Cana­dian pass­ports do not re­quire visas to en­ter Mex­ico if the pur­pose of their trip is tourism and the stay does not ex­ceed 180 days (a fee is ap­pli­ca­ble if en­ter­ing by land. For those trav­el­ling by air the fee is in­cluded in the price of the plane ticket).

How­ever, all Cana­di­ans en­ter­ing Mex­ico ei­ther by plane or land should have a tourist card filled out and have it stamped at their first port of en­try. When en­ter­ing by land, you will have to go to the im­mi­gra­tion booth lo­cated at the bor­der cross­ing. When en­ter­ing by plane and tran­sit­ing through Mex­ico City, your tourist card should be stamped in Mex­ico City be­fore board­ing to­wards your fi­nal des­ti­na­tion. Don’t lose this card – you will need to show it when you leave.

DO NOT DRIVE AT NIGHT!

This is rule #1 for RVing on Baja and we still find campers that do this. The roads are dark, of­ten nar­row, un­fa­mil­iar, used by large trans­port trucks, buses and im­paired driv­ers, and you are likely to hit a cow!

WATCH YOUR SPEED, STAY IN YOUR LANE, KEEP THE RUB­BER ON THE ROAD

Most of Baja is posted at 80 kph (50 mph). Some of the high­way is very nar­row, most of­ten with no shoul­ders. If you leave the road you are prob­a­bly not get­ting back on with­out a tow truck. We have lost many driver side mir­rors, mostly from other RVers driv­ing like they are on the I-5; what is the hurry?

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