Teach kids about Remembrance Day

South Shore Breaker - - Sports - CON­TRIB­UTED edi­tor@southshore­breaker.ca Char­lie Wil­cox

Won­der­ing how to share the im­por­tance of Remembrance Day with your kids?

Here are a few ways to teach your children about the wars that shaped our his­tory and the rea­sons why we pay trib­ute to the men and women who took part in them.

Par­tic­i­pate in Remembrance Day ac­tiv­i­ties

At­tend a Remembrance Day cer­e­mony with your children so they can emo­tion­ally con­nect with the his­tory we com­mem­o­rate on this day. You can also in­volve them in the other tra­di­tions of the hol­i­day like wear­ing pop­pies and hav­ing two min­utes of si­lence.

Read to them

There are a number of books that teach children what Remembrance Day means for Cana­di­ans. Picture books are avail­able for younger children, whereas chap­ter books can be en­joyed by those who are older.

Here are a few sug­ges­tions:

What Is Peace?

By Wal­lace Ed­wards

(for pre-school­ers)

A Poppy Is to Re­mem­ber

By Heather Pat­ter­son and Ron Light­burn

(for Grade 1 and up)

by Sharon E. Mckay (for Grade 4 to 6)

Write and draw

En­cour­age your children to draw a picture or write a poem, story or es­say on the topic of remembrance. They could also par­tic­i­pate in the Royal Cana­dian Le­gion’s An­nual Lit­er­ary and Poster Con­test, which is open to all Cana­dian school children from Grades 1 to 12. Con­sult the Royal Cana­dian Le­gion web­site (le­gion.ca) for more de­tails.

123RF

En­cour­age your children to draw a picture or write a poem, story or es­say on the topic of remembrance.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.