TODAY IN HIS­TORY

St. Thomas Times-Journal - - WORLD NEWS -

In 1659, the Pyre­nees were des­ig­nated as the bound­ary be­tween France and Spain, thus end­ing a 24year war be­tween the two coun­tries.

In 1665, the “London Gazette” was pub­lished for the first time.

In 1781, the last pub­lic burn­ing by the Span­ish In­qui­si­tion took place in Seville.

In 1793, dur­ing the French Rev­o­lu­tion, Chris­tian­ity was abol­ished. Rea­son was de­i­fied, and as many as 2,000 churches were de­stroyed through­out France.

In 1804, Napoleon de­clared him­self em­peror, thus end­ing the First Repub­lic of France.

In 1807, the Lewis and Clark ex­pe­di­tion sighted the Pa­cific Ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River.

In 1836, three men from Bri­tain flew 770 kilo­me­tres from London to Ger­many in a bal­loon. The trip took 18 hours.

In 1867, Marie Curie was born Marie Sk­lodowska in Poland. She shared the No­bel prize for physics in 1903 with her French hus­band for their work in ra­dioac­tiv­ity. She won a sec­ond No­bel prize for her dis­cov­ery of ra­dium in 1911. She died July 4, 1934.

In 1873, the Lib­er­als formed their first fed­eral govern­ment un­der Alexander Macken­zie. John A. Macdon­ald’s Con­ser­va­tives had re­signed two days be­fore due to a bribery scan­dal.

In 1874, the Repub­li­can Party was sym­bol­ized as an ele­phant in a car­toon drawn by Thomas Nast in “Harper’s Weekly.”

In 1879, Leon Trot­sky was born Lev Davi­dovich Bron­stein. A Rus­sian Com­mu­nist leader who played a lead­ing role in both the 1905 rev­o­lu­tion and the Oc­to­ber Rev­o­lu­tion in 1917, he was re­moved from all po­si­tions af­ter the death of Lenin in 1924. Trot­sky was driven into ex­ile and as­sas­si­nated in Mex­ico in 1940.

In 1885, the last spike was driven at Craigel­lachie in B.C.’s Ea­gle Pass, com­plet­ing the Cana­dian Pa­cific Rail­way’s transcon­ti­nen­tal line. Don­ald Smith, a prin­ci­pal CPR share­holder, did the hon­ours. Though the line -- stretch­ing from Mon­treal to Port Moody, B.C. -- was ex­pected to take 10 years to con­struct, it was com­pleted in less than five.

In 1893, the state of Colorado granted its women the right to vote.

In 1898, Her Majesty’s The­atre opened on Guy Street in Mon­treal with “The Bal­let Girl,” a mu­si­cal com­edy. The the­atre re­mained in op­er­a­tion for 65 years, with pre­sen­ta­tions of op­eras, con­certs and bal­lets oc­cu­py­ing its stage. The build­ing was de­mol­ished in 1963.

In 1900, the fed­eral elec­tion sus­tained Sir Wil­frid Lau­rier’s Lib­er­als: Lib­er­als 133; Con­ser­va­tives 80.

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