Canada may not be quite as wealthy as you think

Study shows re­sources that feed Canada’s in­come ei­ther ris­ing slowly or de­clin­ing

StarMetro Halifax - - CANADA & WORLD - ALEX MCKEEN David M. Halbfin­ger THE NEW YORK TIMES Paul Dug­gan THE WASHINGTON POST Louisa Loveluck THE WASHINGTON POST Bob We­berthe CANA­DIAN PRESS

The re­sources that make Canada wealthy aren’t in­creas­ing at the same pace as eco­nomic ac­tiv­ity, po­ten­tially leav­ing fu­ture gen­er­a­tions worse off, a new re­port on the coun­try’s wealth has found.

Canada’s Gross Do­mes­tic Prod­uct (GDP), a met­ric that cap­tures the to­tal eco­nomic in­put and out­put of a coun­try, BER­LIN—A nurse serv­ing a life sen­tence for two mur­ders went on trial Tues­day on charges that he killed a fur­ther 100 pa­tients at two hos­pi­tals in Ger­many.

The mur­der charges against Niels Hoegel, 41, stem from his time at a hos­pi­tal in the north­west­ern city of Olden­burg be­tween 1999 and

2002 and at an­other hos­pi­tal in nearby Del­men­horst from

2003 to 2005.

Hoegel was con­victed in

2015 of two mur­ders and two at­tempted mur­ders. Dur­ing that trial, he said he in­ten­tion­ally brought about car­diac crises in some 90 pa­tients BEIT SHEMESH, IS­RAEL—THE mas­sacre of 11 Jews in Pitts­burgh elicited re­sponses in Is­rael that echoed the re­ac­tions to anti-semitic killings in Paris, Toulouse and Brus­sels: ex­pres­sions of sym­pa­thy, re­minders that ha­tred of Jews is as ram­pant as ever, reaf­fir­ma­tions of the need for a strong Is­rael.

But Satur­day’s mas­sacre also brought to the sur­face painful po­lit­i­cal and the­o­log­i­cal dis­agree­ments tear­ing at has been ris­ing steadily since 1980. It’s the met­ric politi­cians most of­ten cite as an in­di­ca­tor of eco­nomic health, but more and more lead­ers and re­searchers are say­ing that coun­tries need to find some­thing bet­ter.

“It doesn’t dis­tin­guish be­tween ac­tiv­ity that is ben­e­fi­cial or de­struc­tive to us as hu­mans,” said So­nia Furste­nau, Green party MLA for Cowichan Val­ley and an ad­vo­cate for more com­pre­hen­sive eco­nomic mea­sure­ments.

“The econ­omy should be serv­ing peo­ple,” Furste­nau said. “It should op­er­ate in ser­vice to hu­mans and ide­ally to fu­ture gen­er­a­tions as well.” For­mer nurse Niels Hoegel was con­victed in 2015 of two mur­ders and two at­tempted mur­ders in Ger­many. In that trial, he claimed to have killed many more pa­tients.

in Del­men­horst be­cause he en­joyed the feel­ing of be­ing able to re­sus­ci­tate them. He later told in­ves­ti­ga­tors that he also killed pa­tients in Olden­burg. Men at the fu­neral for Tree of Life Con­gre­ga­tion shoot­ing vic­tims.

the fab­ric of Is­raeli so­ci­ety and driv­ing a wedge be­tween Is­raelis and U.S. Jews.

The attacker’s anti-refugee, anti-mus­lim ful­mi­na­tions on so­cial me­dia prompted some on the Is­raeli left — like many Amer­i­can Jewish lib­er­als — to draw an­gry com­par­isons

What’s miss­ing, ac­cord­ing to Robert Smith of the In­ter­na­tional In­sti­tute of Sus­tain­able De­vel­op­ment (IISD), is a “com­pre­hen­sive” mea­sure­ment of wealth. The con­cept doesn’t just ap­ply to cash.

In a new re­port re­leased Tues­day, Smith and a team of re­searchers from the think tank an­a­lyze how Canada fares on a num­ber of fac­tors that con­trib­ute to the longterm pro­duc­tion of value, in­clud­ing the state of the coun­try’s nat­u­ral re­sources and the types of skills its peo­ple have.

“I like to think of wealth as sort of money in the bank and in­come is what you earn off of

Au­thor­i­ties sub­se­quently in­ves­ti­gated hun­dreds of deaths, ex­hum­ing bod­ies of for­mer pa­tients. to views es­poused by the in­creas­ingly na­tion­al­is­tic lead­ers who now hold sway in their govern­ments. The re­sult has been a strik­ing and light­ning-fast politi­ciza­tion of the sort of tragedy that un­til now had only gal­va­nized Jews across the world — not set them at one an­other’s throats.

Here in Is­rael, the an­i­mos­ity be­tween left and right has reached new lev­els of en­mity. Ul­tra-or­tho­dox par­ties that play a king­maker’s role in the right-wing government are press­ing to in­crease their in­flu­ence and that of Jewish law on daily life. Jews from lib­eral U.S. de­nom­i­na­tions feel in­creas­ingly alien­ated from Is­rael’s state-run re­li­gious life. money in the bank,” Smith said. “And so peo­ple can be of­ten one step away from hard times if they lose their in­come un­less they have lots of wealth.”

The same think­ing ap­plies to coun­tries, Smith said, which need to safe­guard and add to the re­sources that pro­vide long-term sources of well-be­ing.

The IISD re­port looked at a num­ber of fac­tors, in­clud­ing what it calls pro­duced cap­i­tal, nat­u­ral cap­i­tal, fi­nan­cial cap­i­tal and hu­man cap­i­tal. The in­sti­tute found that most cat­e­gories saw ei­ther a mar­ginal in­crease or a de­cline and con­cludes that the coun­try’s de­vel­op­ment bloody reign in the Bos­ton un­der­world was aided by crooked FBI agents in the 1980s, and who later went on the lam for 16 years, liv­ing incog­nito by the Cal­i­for­nia seashore, was found dead Oct. 30 while com­plet­ing the first of his two life sen­tences. He was 89.

The Bureau of Prisons con­firmed Tues­day that Bul­ger was found un­re­spon­sive at a pen­i­ten­tiary in Bruce­ton Mills, W.VA., but pro­vided no fur­ther de­tails. IS­TAN­BUL — Turk­ish Pres­i­dent Re­cep Tayyip Er­do­gan said Tues­day that his chief pros­e­cu­tor has asked his Saudi coun­ter­part to re­veal who or­dered the killing of jour­nal­ist Ja­mal Khashoggi inside the Saudi Con­sulate in Is­tan­bul.

The killing has sparked a global firestorm, strain­ing Ankara’s al­ready fraught re­la­tion­ship with Riyadh and press­ing the U.S. Trump ad­min­is­tra­tion to de­fend its most prized Mid­dle East­ern ally, whose lead­er­ship is sus­pected has been “un­sus­tain­able” since 2008.

“All the at­ten­tion gets fo­cused on short-term mea­sures” like GDP, Smith said. “And that tends to put too much em­pha­sis on what is al­ready the nat­u­ral in­cli­na­tion of politi­cians to not look too far into the fu­ture.”

The cat­e­gory that saw the steep­est de­crease be­tween 1980 and 2015 was nat­u­ral cap­i­tal, the IISD re­port found, due to the de­ple­tion of re­sources like lum­ber, fos­sil fu­els and min­er­als.

“When you think about Canada and its his­tory, a lot of well-be­ing has re­lied on ex­tract­ing that nat­u­ral cap­i­tal,” A lengthy re­port by 11 Indigenous com­mu­ni­ties in and around Fort Mcmur­ray says it’s clear there were no plans for emer­gency pro­ce­dures for First Na­tions re­gard­ing the 2016 wild­fire.

It was funded by the Red Cross and is the re­sult of two years of sur­veys, meet­ings and focus groups.

“You had this break­down in un­der­stand­ing,” said re­port au­thor Tim Clark. Pres­i­dent Re­cep Tayyip Er­do­gan said a Turk­ish pros­e­cu­tor re­peated to his Saudi coun­ter­part Tur­key’s ex­tra­di­tion re­quest of 18 sus­pects.

of send­ing a 15-man hit squad to carry out the killing.

“Our pros­e­cu­tor asked who sent the group that came here and said that this needed to be looked at,” Er­do­gan told re­porters as he left Ankara’s WWW.THES­TAR.COM Smith said. But the value of the coun­try’s avail­able re­sources de­clined by 17 per cent be­tween 1980 and 2015, the re­port sug­gests, and cli­mate change presents a grow­ing threat.

The value of Canada’s fi­nan­cial cap­i­tal (think stocks, bonds and bank de­posits) and pro­duced cap­i­tal (build­ings, ma­chin­ery and other phys­i­cal in­fra­struc­ture) both rose over the same pe­riod, but Smith said there’s cause for con­cern. A quar­ter of the coun­try’s pro­duced cap­i­tal wealth is in only two sec­tors: hous­ing and oil-and-gas.

Nurse go­ing on trial in Ger­many over 100 pa­tient deaths

Pitts­burgh mas­sacre bares rifts within Jewish com­mu­nity

Bos­ton crime boss Whitey Bul­ger, 89, dies in prison

Turk­ish pres­i­dent de­mands an­swers from Saudis over Khashoggi killing

First Na­tions left out of Fort Mcmur­ray fire re­sponse

Bei­jing—mar­i­jua­na­may­bele­gal now in Canada but at least three Asian govern­ments are warn­ing their cit­i­zens to avoid it, in­clud­ing the spec­tre of pos­si­ble ar­rest for Ja­panese and South Kore­ans.

China’s Toronto con­sulate is­sued a state­ment re­mind­ing Chi­nese — stu­dents in par­tic­u­lar — “to avoid con­tact with and use of mar­i­juana for the sake of en­sur­ing your own phys­i­cal and men­tal health.”

China warns its cit­i­zens against us­ing mar­i­juana in Canada

wood-pan­elled par­lia­ment.

“We can­not leave this is­sue un­solved,” he said. “We need to solve it now.”

Turk­ish of­fi­cials say Khashoggi was de­tained, tor­tured and dis­mem­bered.

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