Why we need to con­serve nat­u­ral gas this win­ter

If the En­bridge-owned nat­u­ral gas trans­mis­sion pipe­line is re­paired why isn’t it busi­ness as usual?

The Georgia Straight - - News - for­tisbc.com/re­ducey­ou­ruse

En­bridge ex­pects their pipe­line sys­tem to trans­port up to 85 per cent of its full ca­pac­ity fol­low­ing ap­proval from the Na­tional En­ergy Board (NEB). En­gi­neer­ing as­sess­ments will con­tinue on En­bridge’s sys­tem un­til they re­ceive ap­proval from the NEB to re­turn to 100 per cent ca­pac­ity. Dur­ing this pe­riod, our sup­ply will be lim­ited when de­mand is at the high­est, such as an ex­tended cold snap.

Con­ser­va­tion will en­sure we can pro­vide the nat­u­ral gas our cus­tomers need this win­ter. And with more than one mil­lion cus­tomers, a lit­tle con­ser­va­tion can go a long way. Here’s how you can help: Turn down the heat at home: if just 11 homes set their ther­mo­stat 3 °C lower for when they need heat, it could save enough nat­u­ral gas to pro­vide heat and hot wa­ter for one home for a year.1 Turn down the heat at work: if a 23,000 square foot of­fice set its ther­mo­stat 3 °C lower dur­ing of­fice hours, it could save enough nat­u­ral gas to pro­vide heat and hot wa­ter for one home for a year.2 Take shorter show­ers: save hot wa­ter by short­en­ing your show­ers by two min­utes. Put on a sweater: if you’re cold, reach for a sweater, socks or blan­ket in­stead of turn­ing up the heat.

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