The Glengarry News - Glengarry Supplement

Everything you need to know about glazing

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A key determinan­t of a window's energy efficiency is its glazing.

With windows accounting for more than a quarter of the annual space heating needs in a typical new home, using the most energy efficient glazing is a key to conserving energy and realizing cost savings.

As there are more than 300,000 types of window products on the market, and the areas and types can vary widely with the vintage of homes, making the right choice of glazing can be a challenge.

Low-emissivity (low-e) coated windows provide improved thermal performanc­e over clear glass, but the many types of low-e coatings vary greatly when it comes to solar performanc­e.

There are many factors to consider when choosing a glazing, including rising cooling loads, peak electric demands, and heat loss coefficien­ts (Uvalue or u-factor). But one of the most important determinan­ts of a window's energy efficiency is its Solar Heat Gain Coefficien­t (SHGC): the fraction of incident solar radiation that the window admits.

The SHGC is a number between 0 and 1, with low solar gain products having an SHGC of less than 0.30 and high solar gain products an SHGC greater than 0.30.

Studies

To determine the impact of using high versus low solar gain glazing systems, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Natural Resources Canada ( NRCan), and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporatio­n (CMHC), with contributi­ons from 37 companies, used the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) twinhouse facilities to compare high solar heat gain ( HSG) windows and low solar heat gain (LSG) windows.

Thirty-one glazing units were tested in four types of windows -- casement, fixed casement, fixed, and patio door -on north, south, east, and westfacing walls. Both the high HSG and low HSG windows were double-glazed and low ecoated.

Results for HSG and LSG windows were compiled for locations throughout North America and the results for 10 Canadian locations indicated that:

HSG offered 13% to 17% energy cost savings compared to convention­al windows

HSG offered annual energy cost savings of $117 to $354 LSG offered 8% to 10% energy cost savings compared to convention­al windows

LSG offered annual energy cost savings from $71 to $203.

Lessons from the field include the observatio­n that energy efficiency benefits are dependent on the mode of operation, orientatio­n and climate, and that combinatio­ns of glazing (e.g., LSG on the north, HSG on the south) can generate the best results.

 ??  ?? LET IT SNOW: Eric Blais, of R&R Small Engine south of Alexandria, with a Cub Cadet snowblower, a model that cuts through snow, slush and ice, making snow-clearing a breeze. One of the more popular items on his lot is a three-stage machine with powerful impellers that chew through the thickest snow. “There is no blockage, even if you have really deep and wet snow,” he points out. New machines have both power and comfort. Standard features are power steering and heated handles.
LET IT SNOW: Eric Blais, of R&R Small Engine south of Alexandria, with a Cub Cadet snowblower, a model that cuts through snow, slush and ice, making snow-clearing a breeze. One of the more popular items on his lot is a three-stage machine with powerful impellers that chew through the thickest snow. “There is no blockage, even if you have really deep and wet snow,” he points out. New machines have both power and comfort. Standard features are power steering and heated handles.

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