Canada’s 100 Days

THE MARCH TO THE FIRST WORLD WAR’S END NOVEM­BER 11, 1918

The Peterborough Examiner - - Lest We Forget -

On Au­gust 8, 1918, Al­lied forces on the Western Front launched a ma­jor of­fen­sive against the Ger­man lines near the town of Amiens, France. The Bat­tle of Amiens marked the be­gin­ning of Canada’s Hun­dred Days and the last three months of the First World War. Canada’s Hun­dred Days cul­mi­nated with the end of the First World War and the sign­ing of the Ar­mistice on Novem­ber 11, 1918. Dur­ing this pe­riod a se­ries of im­pres­sive Cana­dian Corps vic­to­ries on the Western Front so­lid­i­fied their rep­u­ta­tion as elite shock troops. Fol­low­ing the suc­cess of the Cana­dian Corps and their Al­lies in the Bat­tle of Amiens, the Cana­di­ans were moved north back to Ar­ras. Hav­ing lit­tle rest, they con­tin­ued to pres­sure the Ger­man forces, break­ing the Dro­court-Quéant Line on Septem­ber 2, breach­ing the Hin­den­burg Line with the cap­ture of Bour­lon Wood on Septem­ber 27, and then press­ing on through Cam­brai, Mount Houy, Va­len­ci­ennes and into Mons, Bel­gium in Oc- to­ber and early Novem­ber 1918. Dur­ing the last three months of the First World War, the Cana­dian Corps ad­vanced roughly 130 kilo­me­tres and took some 32,000 Ger­man prison­ers and cap­tured al­most 3,800 en­emy ar­tillery pieces, ma­chine guns and mor­tars. By the con­clu­sion of Canada’s Hun­dred Days, 30 Cana­di­ans and New­found­lan­ders had earned the Vic­to­ria Cross, the high­est dec­o­ra­tion for valour they could re­ceive. The ar­mistice to end the First World War took ef­fect at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. In 2018, the Govern­ment of Canada will mark the 65th an­niver­sary of the Korean War Ar­mistice, the 10th an­niver­sary of Na­tional Peace­keep­ers’ Day and the 100th an­niver­sary of Canada’s Hun­dred Days and the Ar­mistice—mile- stones on the road to peace and free­dom we con­tinue to walk today.

A Cana­dian cy­clist shout­ing down a dug-out in Ger­man for men to come out. Ad­vance East of Ar­ras. Septem­ber, 1918. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

The first Cana­dian pla­toon to en­ter Va­len­ci­ennes from the west, ad­vanc­ing to­wards the Canal. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

Ma­jor McGill and as­sis­tants, 5th Cana­dian Field Am­bu­lance, dress­ing wounded out­doors, Bat­tle of Amiens.. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

Cana­di­ans con­struct­ing a bridge across Canal du Nord. Ad­vance east of Ar­ras. Septem­ber, 1918. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

Cana­dian troops ad­vanc­ing to­ward Cam­brai. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

Cana­di­ans march­ing through the streets of Mons on the morn­ing of 11 Novem­ber 1918. Photo: Li­brary and Ar­chives Canada

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