MONEY IN BRIEF

The Prince George Citizen - - Money -

Cur­ren­cies

Th­ese are in­dica­tive whole­sale rates for for­eign cur­rency pro­vided by the Bank of Canada on Fri­day. Quo­ta­tions in Cana­dian funds. Aus­tralia dol­lar 0.9024 Brazil real 0.3239 China ren­minbi 0.1851 Euro 1.4543 Hong Kong dol­lar 0.1681 In­dia ru­pee 0.01838 In­done­sia ru­piah 0.000093 Ja­pan yen 0.01233 Malaysia ring­git 0.3151 Mex­ico peso 0.06735 N.Z. dol­lar 0.8474 Nor­way krone 0.1468 Peru­vian new sol 0.3938

Rus­sia rou­ble 0.02003

Saudi riyal 0.3513 Sin­ga­pore dol­lar 0.9545

South Africa rand 0.08924

South Korean won 0.001106 Swe­den krona 0.1369 Switzer­land franc 1.3339 Tai­wanese dol­lar 0.04221 Thai­land baht 0.043 Tur­key lira 0.2305 U.K. pound 1.6209 U.S. dol­lar 1.3174

Viet­nam dong 0.000057

The mar­kets to­day

Canada’s main stock in­dex was weighed down Fri­day by weak­en­ing gold prices but the loonie climbed to its high­est level in more than a month fol­low­ing a strong jobs re­port. The Cana­dian dol­lar traded at an av­er­age of 75.91 cents US, the high­est level since July 30, and com­pared with an av­er­age of 75.60 cents US on Thurs­day, af­ter Sta­tis­tics Canada re­ported the econ­omy added 81,100 jobs last month.

The dol­lar has gained nearly one cent since the Bank of Canada on Wed­nes­day kept its overnight in­ter­est rate steady at 1.75 per cent.

That was re­in­forced by the jobs re­port that ex­ceeded ex­pec­ta­tions.

The S&P/TSX com­pos­ite in­dex closed down 39.48 points at 16,535.33 on a broad-based de­cline led by ma­te­ri­als as gold fell fur­ther from its six-year high. The sec­tor de­creased 2.3 per cent as shares in miners in­clud­ing Bar­rick Gold Corp. and Kin­ross Gold Corp. closed lower.

The De­cem­ber gold con­tract was down US$10 at US$1,515.50 an ounce and the De­cem­ber cop­per con­tract was down 0.8 of a cent at US$2.63 a pound.

En­ergy was one of seven ma­jor sec­tors on the TSX to lose ground. It de­creased de­spite the price of crude oil ris­ing on hope that a trade deal be­tween the U.S. and China will sal­vage global de­mand.

The Oc­to­ber crude con­tract was up 22 cents at US$56.52 per bar­rel and the Oc­to­ber nat­u­ral gas con­tract was up 6.1 cents at US$2.50 per mmBTU. Health care, fi­nan­cials, con­sumer sta­ples and telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions closed higher.

In New York, the Dow Jones in­dus­trial av­er­age was up 69.31 points at 26,797.46. The S&P 500 in­dex was up 2.71 points at 2,978.71, while the Nas­daq com­pos­ite was down 13.76 points at 8,103.07.

The Dow and S&P 500 rose on ex­pec­ta­tions that weaker U.S. jobs num­bers would re­in­force the move for lower in­ter­est rates, added Head­land. Fed­eral Re­serve chair­man Jerome Powell gave no hint about the cen­tral bank’s rate plans but said in a speech in Zurich that it would “use our tools to sup­port the econ­omy, and that’s what we’ll con­tinue to do.”

Powell added that he doesn’t fore­see a re­ces­sion.

“The most likely out­look is still mod­er­ate growth, a strong labour mar­ket and in­fla­tion con­tin­u­ing to move back up.”

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