911 mis­use con­sumes valu­able po­lice time

The Standard (Elliot Lake) - - LAW -

were pa­trolling on High­way 108 in El­liot Lake.

Po­lice ob­served a ve­hi­cle trav­el­ling in ex­cess of the posted speed limit. This ob­ser­va­tion was con­firmed by radar and a sub­se­quent traf­fic stop was con­ducted. The in­ves­ti­ga­tion also re­vealed that the male driver’s li­cence was sus­pended and the ve­hi­cle was not in­sured. As a re­sult, the driver was charged and the ve­hi­cle was towed.

William Mcdon­ald, 44 years of age, from Sud­bury, was charged with: op­er­ate mo­tor ve­hi­cle on a high­way with­out in­sur­ance; driv­ing while un­der sus­pen­sion; and speed­ing (1 - 49km/ hr) over the posted limit.

The ac­cused is sched­uled to ap­pear in El­liot Lake Court on Dec. 5. 11:08 p.m., the East Al­goma OPP mem­bers were pa­trolling on High­way 108 in El­liot Lake.

Po­lice ob­served a ve­hi­cle with only one On­tario li­cence plate. A sub­se­quent traf­fic stop was con­ducted. The in­ves­ti­ga­tion re­vealed that the val­i­da­tion per­mit was also ex­pired.

Keith Gofenko, 47 years of age, from El­liot Lake, was charged with: drive mo­tor ve­hi­cle, fail to dis­play two plates; and drive mo­tor ve­hi­cle, no cur­rently val­i­dated per­mit.

Have you ever thought about what hap­pens when some­one calls 911? This is some­thing that very few cit­i­zens think of, yet it con­sumes a sig­nif­i­cant amount of re­sources for the po­lice and other emer­gency ser­vices.

When a per­son calls 911 an op­er­a­tor an­swers the phone and asks if the caller needs po­lice, fire or am­bu­lance. De­pend­ing on the an­swer, the op­er­a­tor trans­fers the call to the ap­pro­pri­ate emer­gency ser­vices provider and help is sent as quickly as pos­si­ble. If needed, the caller may be patched in with more than one agency at the same time to en­sure that the best re­sponse pos­si­ble is pro­vided.

But what hap­pens when some­one calls 911 and hangs up on the op­er­a­tor? Or, a 911 pocket dial is sent by a cell­phone. That is not such a sim­ple ques­tion. When a 911 call is lost, it’s called a “dropped 911”

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