The Telegram (St. John's)

Convicted murderer Brian Doyle to stay in jail

Parole board member confirms April decision to revoke day parole

- BARB SWEET THE TELEGRAM barbara.sweet @thetelegra­m.com @Barbsweett­weets

Convicted Newfoundla­nd and Labrador killer Brian Doyle is staying in prison in B.C.

Doyle, given a life sentence for a gruesome 1991 murder in St. John’s, had his day parole revoked in April by the Pacific branch of the Parole Board of Canada.

Doyle had lied and breached a serious condition of his parole — not immediatel­y reporting a relationsh­ip with a woman.

That April decision was confirmed Friday in a parole board hearing, which was observed via Webex by Saltwire Network.

Doyle slashed to death Catherine Carroll, a crime that saw her son, Greg Parsons, wrongly convicted until DNA evidence proved otherwise.

“This is a great day for us,” Parsons said moments after the Friday hearing.

“If my wife and I weren’t fighting the fight we had, he would have skated through that system. We finally won the battle.”

Parsons said he plans to confront the Newfoundla­nd and Labrador Justice Department to explain why it didn’t heed evidence from a Mr. Big sting operation and instead pursued a second-degree murder conviction against Doyle.

“I was totally betrayed and used. … I (also) feel used by my legal representa­tion,” said Parsons, who added that justice for his mother was also stolen.

“I want to know what the government is going to do with this to try to put my family at peace. … This almost broke me this time.”

Parsons wants Doyle placed in a higher-security prison, and to access appropriat­e rehabilita­tion programmin­g.

But he wasn’t buying the sobs from Doyle as he was questioned Friday by parole board member Kevin D’souza about the night Carroll was slain.

Doyle claims he had a sexual relationsh­ip with Carroll that started at age 15 and likened it to a schoolboy fantasy. When she rejected him after he went to her house after a wild party, all the repressed emotions of his life spilled out of him, he said.

“I wish I could go back and how truly sorry I am for the lives I have destroyed,” Doyle said.

“It was the worst bit of acting I have ever seen,” Parsons said — after the hearing — of Doyle’s tears.

As for his day parole relationsh­ip, Doyle admitted to seeing the woman before work and using visits to a niece as ways to cover on his time sheets away from his halfway house.

D’souza acknowledg­ed Doyle has made progress and has community and family support.

But Doyle, he said, had admitted he can fall into old patterns and risky thinking, and that is very concerning.

“The board was correct in revoking your day parole release and I am confirming that revocation today,” D’souza said.

Parsons wrote his fifth victim impact statement in preparatio­n for the hearing.

He said the parole officer needs to be held accountabl­e for not keeping a closer eye on Doyle.

“I hope everyone realizes the severity of (Doyle’s) infraction and what could have been the end result if Brian Doyle had been rejected by this woman, as he has never been treated or received counsellin­g for his predatoria­l, sexually deviant behaviour,” Parsons said.

“As Brian Doyle said in his own words, he considers himself a chameleon and that’s the first piece of truth that I’ve ever heard come out of Brian Doyle’s mouth. Brian Doyle is a chameleon and he’s slipped through the cracks of the system and conned the players involved with his case ever since he’s been in the prison system.”

Parsons continues to be outraged that Doyle claimed to have had a sexual relationsh­ip with Carroll.

“I can definitive­ly state that this is a last-ditch effort by a desperate murderer to seek pity and gain his freedom. When Brian Doyle was 15 years old, both my brother, Todd, and I lived at 16 James Pl. with my mother, and I can guarantee this event would have never had the opportunit­y or the means to happen,” Parsons said.

Parsons also said he’s been in touch with Los Angeles police about potential involvemen­t of Doyle in crimes there, based on statements he made in the Mr. Big sting.

Doyle stabbed Carroll 53 times on New Year’s Day 1991.

Parsons discovered her body the next day.

Doyle allowed his friend at the time, Parsons, to be wrongfully convicted of the murder in 1994. DNA evidence cleared Parsons in 1998.

In 2001, Doyle was under the belief that a man — who was actually an undercover agent — was inviting him to join an organized crime group, and had offered him $20,000 to murder his wife, who was actually fictitious. In that Mr. Big sting operation, Doyle admitted murdering Carroll and bragged that he could set up the murder in such a way as to point guilt onto someone else.

 ?? TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO ?? Greg Parsons of St. John’s virtually attended another parole board hearing Friday for Brian Doyle, who murdered Parsons’ mother in 1991.
TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO Greg Parsons of St. John’s virtually attended another parole board hearing Friday for Brian Doyle, who murdered Parsons’ mother in 1991.
 ?? TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO ?? Brian Doyle (right) speaks to lawyer John Duggan in Newfoundla­nd and Labrador Supreme Court in St. John’s in 2002.
TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO Brian Doyle (right) speaks to lawyer John Duggan in Newfoundla­nd and Labrador Supreme Court in St. John’s in 2002.

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