Times Colonist

Public can judge the paintings

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How sad, shortsight­ed and downright foolish that the 1930s murals in the B.C. legislatur­e building are to be permanentl­y covered up in the name of political correctnes­s.

If we are going to ban or hide all art and literature that could offend somebody, then the world will become a very dull place indeed. Shakespear­e will be out for a start; his plays are full of themes and language that might be considered inappropri­ate today. And countless thousands of paintings and sculptures in public places won’t stand the harsh scrutiny of political correctnes­s.

Does the provincial government really think that its citizens, native and non-native, are incapable of seeing beyond stereotype­s of the past and have to be protected or mollified in some way? I find that grossly insulting. Terry J. Waller Victoria

 ??  ?? Among the murals in the rotunda at the legislativ­e buildings is this one, called Justice, depicting chief justice Matthew Baillie Begbie presiding over a trial in the Cariboo community of Clinton in the early 1860s. The artist was George Southwell. The...
Among the murals in the rotunda at the legislativ­e buildings is this one, called Justice, depicting chief justice Matthew Baillie Begbie presiding over a trial in the Cariboo community of Clinton in the early 1860s. The artist was George Southwell. The...

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