Toronto Star

Worshipper asks: Where is our Martin Luther King?

- mpotter@thestar.ca

Muslim minority added fuel to the Christian partisansh­ip. “All the churches became divided at that point, and it undermined their ability to speak as authoritie­s above politics,” said Joseph Mwangi, a Nairobi businessma­n who prayed yesterday at Holy Family Minor. “I think we are all disappoint­ed by these developmen­ts. It doesn’t make us less worshipful. We still come to offer prayer. But we do so knowing that in Kenya, there is no church leader with the power of a Desmond Tutu or a Martin Luther King. And we really need one.” Tutu, the South African archbishop, four days ago led what is now a revolving door of foreign dignitarie­s working to close the gap between Kenya’s rival political camps. Embattled President Kibaki, who initially resisted all calls for internatio­nal mediation, yesterday softened his stance, opening the way for the imminent arrival of Ghanian President John Kufour, current chair of the African Union. Kufour’s entry into the crisis comes as the effects of Kenya’s stalled economy washes more strongly over its East Africa neighbours, threatenin­g to undermine stability with shortages of fuel and other essential goods. Mitch Potter is the Star’s Europe Bureau Chief. Contact him at

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 ?? STR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES ?? Residents of Nairobi’s Mathare receive food aid. Post-election violence has displaced 250,000 Kenyans, prompting warnings of a humanitari­an crisis.
STR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES Residents of Nairobi’s Mathare receive food aid. Post-election violence has displaced 250,000 Kenyans, prompting warnings of a humanitari­an crisis.

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